12th ESSE CONFERENCE

Dates: 29. 08. 2014 - 02. 09. 2014

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Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, The Department of British and American Studies, Faculty of Arts
and SKASE (The Slovak Association for the Study of English)


look forward to welcoming you to the
12th ESSE CONFERENCE
in
KOŠICE, SLOVAKIA
Friday 29 August – Tuesday 2 September, 2014

General questions about the ESSE 2014 Conference in Košice should be sent by e-mail to esse2014info@upjs.sk

SPONSORS

SUPPORTERS

NEW EXTENDED DEADLINES

NEW EXTENDED DEADLINES!
EARLY REGISTRATION EXTENDED UNTIL 15 JUNE 2014

Early registration: 1 April 2014 – 15 June 2014.
Late registration: 16 June 2014 – 29 August 2014.

REGISTRATION

REGISTRATION NOW!

A flat fee will be charged for the entire Conference. There will be no daily rate. Please note that the fee includes the opening dinner and concert, the guided tour of Košice and the conference barbecue.

ESSE members, early registration by 15 June 2014€ 120
ESSE members, registering on and after 16 June 2014€ 200
Non-ESSE members, early registration by 15 May 2014€ 160
Non-ESSE members, registering on and after 16 June 2014€ 240
Accompanying persons€ 40

Postgraduate Students
(please send a letter from the supervisor confirming status)

€ 60

Complete the online registration form below and click to submit it.
Note that your first name, last name, affiliation and country will appear on the badge; the same information plus your e-mail will appear in the conference programme.

ONLINE REGISTRATION FORM
available here

PAYMENT METHOD

Note that your registration is not final until payment is received. For early bird registrations payment must be sent by the deadline date.

Payment method
There are two ways of making payments:

1. payment by bank transfer to the conference bank account:
Any fees charged by remitting banks are to be paid by the conference participants. It is the responsibility of the sender to ensure that the conference receives the full amount. Any amount deducted by the banks for charges will be charged in cash on the first day of the conference.

Bank details for transfers:
Beneficiary name: Progress CA s.r.o.
Beneficiary address: Krivá 18, 04001 Košice, Slovakia
Bank name: Sberbank Slovensko, a. s. Košice
Bank address: Mlynská 29, 043 73 Košice, Slovakia
Account number: 4350225857/3100
IBAN: SK 14 31 00 0000 0043 5022 5857
SWIFT/BIC CODE : LUBA SK BX

Please ensure that your transfer is identifiable by including the message „ESSE 14“ and your name, e.g. „ESSE 14 John Smith“.

2. payment by credit card
To pay by credit card, please download THE CREDIT CARD AUTHORIZATION FORM here and complete it, ensuring that you sign it. Note that a 5% credit card fee must be added to the total. Send a copy of your form by fax (+421–55–680–6156) or as a scanned file attachment by e-mail (gabriela.sujanova@progress.eu.sk).

Receipts
Reception of payment will be confirmed by e-mail. Printed receipts will be issued at the registration desk.

Cancellation
The registration fee will be refunded for cancellations made by the 30th June 2014 (bank charges to be borne by participant). No registration fee refunds will be made for cancellations after that date. Cancellations with refund requests should be made by e-mail to gabriela.sujanova@progress.eu.sk.

FEE WAIVERS

A number of delegates for whom attending the conference presents financial difficulties will be granted full or partial fee-waivers. Applications should be sent between 1 April and 30 April 2014 to esse2014info@upjs.sk. Applicants will be informed shortly thereafter whether they have been granted a fee waiver.

INSURANCE

Please note that neither Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, nor SKASE, nor ESSE will pay for, or accept liability for, travel, accommodation, living or other expenses incurred by lecturers, convenors, co-convenors, or those invited to participate in round tables, seminars, PhD sessions or posters, unless previously agreed in writing.

All conference participants should be aware that neither Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, nor SKASE, nor ESSE have or will accept any liability whatsoever for any damage or injury to visitors, to the university or to property, however such damage or injury may be caused.
Delegates are expected to be fully insured by their own institutions or through their personal insurance for personal health, accident/property coverage (also against claims made by third parties) during their participation in the Conference.

TRAVEL TO KOŠICE

By air: The easiest way to get to Košice is flying via Prague (Czech Airlines), Vienna (Austrian Airlines), London Luton (Wizz Air) or Bratislava (Czech Airlines).
Košice is also connected with Budapest and Krakow airports by minibus service (approx. 3 hours’ bus journey).

By train: From Bratislava, Prague, Budapest, etc. there are IC and Express trains to Košice. You can find detailed information about current train services at www.zsr.sk.

By coach: From many European and Slovak cities and towns there are Eurolines and Express coaches to Košice. You can find detailed information about current coach timetables at www.cp.sk.

ACCOMMODATION

The following accommodation options are offered to conference participants and accompanying persons by the conference organizers in cooperation with the conference agency, Progress. These specially-negotiated conference prices are available only through Progress and only until 30 June. Bookings can be made online by filling in the Accommodation and Optional Trips Booking Form. All hotels are within walking distance of the conference venue. A map showing the hotels can be found below.

HOW TO BOOK YOUR ACCOMMODATION

Bookings can be made online by filling in and submitting the Accommodation and Optional Trips Booking Form here. Once your booking has been received, you will be contacted by Ms. Gabriela Sujanova with confirmation of your reservation and details of the amount to pay.

Hotel Yasmin**** Tyršovo nábrežie 1, Košice, www.hotel-yasmin.sk
€75.50 Mon-Thur / €72.50 weekend single room (including breakfast)
€97.50 Mon-Thur / €87.50 weekend double room (including breakfast)
Municipality Tax: €1.50 per person per night
Internet, air conditioning

Hotel Double Tree by Hilton **** Hlavná 123/1, Košice, www.doubletree-kosice.com
€69 single room (including breakfast)
€89 double room (including breakfast)
Municipality Tax: €1.50 per person per night
Internet, air conditioning

Hotel Gloria Palac*** Bottova 1, Košice 040 01, www.gloriapalac.sk
€59 single room (including breakfast)
€59 double room (including breakfast)
Municipality Tax: €1.50 per person per night
Internet

Hotel Centrum*** Južná trieda 2054/2A, Košice, www.hotel-centrum.sk
€50 single room (including breakfast)
€65 double room (including breakfast)
Municipality Tax: €1.50 per person per night
Internet

Pension Hradbova*** Hradbová 9, Košice, www.penzionhradbova.sk
€61 single room (including breakfast)
€81 double room (including breakfast)
Municipality Tax: €1.50 per person per night
Internet

Teledom Hotel *** Timonova 755/27, Košice, www.hotelteledom.sk
€66 single room (including breakfast)
€83 double room (including breakfast)
Municipality Tax: €1.50 per person per night
Internet, air conditioning

Garni Hotel Akadémia ** Južná trieda 10, Košice, www.hotelakademia.sk
€38 single room (including breakfast)
€57 double room (including breakfast)
Municipality Tax: €1.50 per person per night
Internet

TUKE University Guest House accommodation* Boženy Němcovej 1, Košice,
www.tuke.sk/…ytovanie/bn1

The rooms are arranged in pairs of two rooms (one double room and one single room) connected by a corridor, sharing a shower and WC.
Prices: €20 per person in a double room occupied by two persons, €30 per person in a single room.
Municipality Tax: €1.50 per person per night
Breakfast can be arranged for €5 per person.
Internet, there is a fridge in each connecting corridor.

Payment method

There are two ways of making payments.

1. payment by bank transfer to the conference bank account:
Any fees charged by remitting banks are to be paid by the conference participants. It is the responsibility of the sender to ensure that the conference receives the full amount. Any amount deducted by the banks for charges will be charged in cash on the first day of the conference.

Bank details for transfers:
Beneficiary name: Progress CA s.r.o.
Beneficiary address: Krivá 18, 04001 Košice, Slovakia
Bank name: Sberbank Slovensko, a. s. Košice
Bank address: Mlynská 29, 043 73 Košice, Slovakia
Account number: 4350225857/3100
IBAN: SK 14 31 00 0000 0043 5022 5857
SWIFT/BIC CODE : LUBA SK BX

Please ensure that your transfer is identifiable by including the message ‘ESSE 14’ and your name, e.g. ‘ESSE 14 John Smith’.

2. payment by credit card
To pay by credit card, please download THE CREDIT CARD AUTHORIZATION FORM here and complete it, ensuring that you sign it. Note that a 5% credit card fee must be added to the total. Send a copy of your form by fax (+421–55–680–6156) or as a scanned file attachment by e-mail (gabriela.sujanova@progress.eu.sk).

Receipts
Reception of payment will be confirmed by e-mail. Printed receipts will be issued at the registration desk.

CANCELLATION POLICY

This cancellation policy is determined by the conditions set by the hotels.
Cancellations received no later than 60 days prior to check-in date – no cancellation charges.
Cancellations received between 59–45 days prior to check-in date – refund minus the cost of one night.
Cancellations received between 44–30 days prior to check-in date – 50% of the total price refunded.
Cancellations received less than 29 days prior to check-in date – no refund.

INSURANCE

Please note that neither Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, nor SKASE, nor ESSE can accept liability for travel, accommodation, living or other expenses incurred by lecturers, convenors, co-convenors, or those invited to participate in round tables, seminars, PhD sessions or posters.
All conference participants should be aware that neither Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, nor SKASE, nor ESSE have or will accept any liability whatsoever for any damage or injury to visitors, to the university or to property, however such damage or injury may be caused. Delegates are expected to be fully insured by their own institutions or through their personal insurance for personal health, accident/property coverage (also against claims made by third parties) during their participation in the Conference.

KOŠICE

KOŠICE – A UNIVERSITY CITY AND EUROPEAN CAPITAL OF CULTURE IN 2013
Košice is a city with an eventful and illustrious past and multicultural and colourful present. It is a seat of culture and education. During the university semesters students make the city their own, and one may find them at every turn: in the theatres, the museums, the galleries, the concert halls, the libraries, and the parks. Almost nine thousand future professionals in medical, legal, scientific, social, philosophical disciplines and arts study at Pavol Jozef Šafárik University, further swelling the already large permanent population of the city of over 240,000.

Košice’s earliest documents date back to 1230 and refer to it as “Villa Cassa”. Its coat of arms is the oldest in Europe, a fact attested to by a letter dating from 1369. The city's historic sights – from various periods – are concentrated in the centre, the Urban Heritage Area. The recently reconstructed Main Street, lined by the houses and palaces of the burghers of the past, offers visitors a pleasant stroll, and is also the venue for many major events. Košice has always been known for its extraordinary mixture of cultures and dialects, a mixture that contributes greatly to the attractions of the city.

More about Košice at www.kosice.sk

PAVOL JOZEF ŠAFÁRIK UNIVERSITY IN KOŠICE

Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice (UPJŠ) is the second oldest university in Slovakia. The history of higher education in Košice goes back to the year 1657, when the bishop Benedict Kishdy founded the Academia Cassoviensis, which was run by the Jesuits of Jesus’ Community. The University of Košice Golden Bull issued in 1660 by the Holy Roman Emperor Leopold I granted the Universitas Cassoviensis the same privileges as all the other universities of the Habsburg empire. The structure of Universitas Cassoviensis was similar to that of other universities, with faculties of Philosphy, Law and Theology, the last of these being the strongest. Study at the Philosophical Faculty was dedicated primarily to philosophy, history and languages, but the lectures – which were in Latin – also included presentations of the natural sciences: physics, mathematics, geography and botany. The Universitas Cassoviensis had its own library and a church, and it significantly influenced the advancement of science, educational attainment and spiritual culture in the 17th and 18th centuries.

In 1959 the traditions of the Universitas Cassoviensis were revived through the foundation of the Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice. It originally consisted of the Faculty of Medicine (in Košice) and the Faculty of Philosophy (in Prešov). Gradually the university was enlarged by the addition of new faculties:the Faculty of Science in Košice in 1963, the Faculty of Education in Prešov in 1964, Faculty of Law in Košice in 1973, the Faculty of Public Administration in Košice in 1998, and finally the Faculty of Arts in Košice in 2007.

Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice is the second classical university of Slovakia. It ranks among the important and widely-recognized educational and research institutions not only in Slovakia, but also in Europe. Its key mission is to provide education and service to its students and the community by spreading knowledge based on the most recent scientific findings in an international context, as well as to conduct high-quality research. The UPJŠ also supports activities contributing to the education and culture of the public and it helps students develop greater wisdom, creativity, tolerance, critical and independent thinking, self-confidence, and both regional and national awareness.

At present the UPJŠ provides education at its five faculties to almost 9,000 students in more than 105 BA, 65 MA and 35 PhD programmes, with more than 700 lecturers and research staff who use the results of their own high-quality scientific research, the most recent experimental technology, the latest ITC and innovative methods of education.

The University has mainly focused on creating a permanent system of monitoring and improving the quality of education in all the accredited study programmes. Instead of extensive generating new study programmes and increasing the number of students, the emphasis has been placed on optimising the content and methods of implementation of the existing study programmes. The university policy is to promote maximum mutual openness and connectedness of courses, so that the students may benefit from the widest range of opportunities across the university, not just within individual faculties. Improving the quality of the education provided and of the university organization has required a focus on improvement of the physical infrastructure, particularly continuous modernisation and variation of teaching technology, specifically exploiting the Internet and new information technologies.

Students can use the services of the University Library, the Centre for Information and Communication Technologies, and the Botanical Garden. The UPJŠ has more than 2,500 accommodation places, and excellent catering services located near the city centre. The Institute of Physical Education and Sports offers education in the field of sports and recreation, training courses for students, physical education camps, and hobby sports activities for staff, students and public throughout the year, also organizing such events as University Days of Sport, the Wellness Day, or the Intervention Motion Programme.

Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice has established itself in the European education and research arena. It is a member of the European University Association and a signatory of Magna Charta Universitatum. It is a seat of the European Documentation Centre, the Institute of European Law and the Austrian Library. Both education and scientific research at the UPJŠ are carried on in a broad international context and follow European trends. The research teams, led by internationally recognized personalities, use funding from both national and international sources; every year up to 200 research projects are funded (around 20 by foreign grants). The number of publications per staff member in high-quality international journals, the high proportion of papers registered in the Current Contents Connect database and the number of citations in registered databases rank the UPJŠ amongst the best research universities in Slovakia.

The development of the international dimension of the UPJŠ is closely related to the LLP/Erasmus mobility programme for staff and students and to mobility within the National Scholarship Programme of the Slovak Republic. The numbers of UPJŠ students who complete part of their studies abroad as well as the number of incoming students and staff are all growing. The UPJŠ has more than 230 Erasmus bilateral agreements with universities in 20 countries. For international Erasmus students, the International Office of UPJŠ regularly organizes EILC – Erasmus Intensive Language Courses – that enable incoming students to study the Slovak language, to understand the Slovak culture, and to become familiar with the academic milieu in Slovakia.
Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice is also open to Free Movers.

For more information about the Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, please visit www.upjs.sk.
 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMME

Please note that each conference participant may convene or co-convene one or more round table(s), seminar(s), and doctoral session(s). However, each conference participant may only present ONE PAPER during the conference – one lecture or one round table paper or one seminar paper or one poster, whether in the round table / seminar session that he or she convenes or in a different one.
Postgraduate students selected for the Doctoral Sessions may in addition present one other paper in a regular seminar.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMME COMMITTEE

Slávka Tomaščíková (P. J. Šafárik University in Košice) (chair)
Işil Baş (Boğaziçi University)
Andreas H. Jucker (University of Zürich)
Lívia Körtvélyessy (P. J. Šafárik University in Košice)
Pierre Lurbe (Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3)
Maria Socorro Suárez (Universidad de Oviedo)
Soňa Šnircová (P. J. Šafárik University in Košice)
Pavol Štekauer (P. J. Šafárik University in Košice)

PROGRAMME

12th ESSE CONFERENCE in KOŠICE, SLOVAKIA
Friday 29 August – Tuesday 2 September, 2014

Organised by Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia
Department of British and American Studies, Faculty of Arts
and
SKASE (The Slovak Association for the Study of English)

To be held at P. J. Šafárik University in Košice, Šrobárova 2, Košice

Registration and conference information centre:
Friday 29 August 2014, from 9.00 to 18.00 at the House of Arts, Moyzesova 66, Ground Floor
Saturday 30 August – Monday 1 September 2014 from 9.00 to 18.00 at the Rectorate, Šrobárova 2, Senate Meeting Room, 1st Floor

Conference programme

Friday 29 August 2014 House of Arts, Moyzesova 66

09.00–18.00 Registration and conference information centre
10.00, 11.30, 13.00 Free guided tours of Košice centre (groups of 20–30 people; tour begins and ends at the House of Arts)
14.30–15.30 Opening of the conference
15.30–16.30 Plenary lecture 1

USING Wmatrix TO ANALYSE CHARACTER CONTRASTS (AND THEMES AND FOREGROUNDED MOMENTS) IN BETRAYAL BY HAROLD PINTER
Professor Dr. Mick Short, Lancaster University, U.K.

16.30–17.00 Coffee break
17.00–18.00 Poetry reading
18.15–19.00 Concert for conference participants and accompanying persons
19.00 Welcome dinner for conference participants and accompanying persons

Saturday 30 August 2014 UPJŠ Rectorate and Campus, Šrobárova 2

09.00–18.00 Conference information centre, Rectorate, Senate Meeting Room, 1st floor
09.30–18.00 Book exhibition
09.30–18.00 Poster presentations (posters only)
11.00, 12.30, 16.00, 17.30 Free guided tours of Košice centre (groups of 20–30 people, 60 minutes, begins and ends at the Rectorate)

09.30–10.30 Parallel lectures 1

How Trauma Turns into Literature: Romanian-American Writers
Michaela Mudure
Babes-Bolyai University in Cluj, Romania mmudure@lett.ubbcluj.ro
Technical University of Liberec, Czech Republic mmudure@yahoo.com

Can we arrive at an agreement on the compound status?
Stanislav Kavka
Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia ca348439@tiscali.cz

A Life Sentence: Twenty Years of Convict Studies Research and the Female Factory Research Group, Tasmania
Susan Ballyn
University of Barcelona, Spain susan.ballyn@gmail.com

10.30–11.00 Coffee break + Poster presentations (authors at posters)

11.00–13.00 Seminars, Round tables and PhD sessions

RT6, PhD Cult A, SLANG16 A, SLITE7 A, RT5, Special RT Gender, SLANG32 A, SLANG4 A, SLITE3 A, SLITE2 A, SLITE11 A, SLITE15, SLANG10 A, SLANG12, SLANG14 A

13.00–14.30 Lunch break
14.30–15.30 Plenary lecture 2

WALTER SCOTT AND THE RESTORATION OF EUROPE
Professor Dr. Fiona Robertson, St Mary's University College, U.K.

15.45–16.45 Parallel lectures 2

Coleridge’s Daemonic Imagination
Gregory M. Leadbetter
Birmingham City University, the UK gregory.leadbetter@bcu.ac.uk

“I tell you this, because I come from your country”. The popularization of science and the linguistic construction of reliability in nineteenth-century travelogues and ego documents
Marina Dossena
Università degli Studi di Bergamo, Italy marina.dossena@unibg.it

(Child)reign of Terror: Dangerous Child Régimes
Björn Sundmark
Malmö University, Sweden bjorn.sundmark@mah.se

16.45–17.15 Coffee break + Poster presentations (authors at posters)

17.15–18.45 Seminars, Round tables and PhD sessions

SLITE12, SLITE9 A, SLANG18, SLANG 16B, SLANG9 A, SLANG6 A, SLANG32 B, SLANG4 B, SLITE3 B, SLITE2 B, SLITE11 B, SLITE17, SLANG10 B, SCULT5, SLANG14 B

19.00 Visit to the Tokay cellars (see Social Programme)

Sunday 31 August 2014 UPJŠ Rectorate and Campus, Šrobárova 2

09.00–18.00 Conference information centre, Rectorate, Senate Meeting Room, 1st floor
09.30–18.00 Book exhibition
09.30–18.00 Poster presentations (posters only)
11.00, 12.30, 15.00, 16.30 Free guided tours of Košice centre (groups of 20–30 people, 60 minutes, begins and ends at the Rectorate)

09.30–10.30 Parallel Lectures 3

Eschatology and the motif of the vanities in Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice
Line Cottegnies
Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3, France line.cottegnies@free.fr

Lexical Mortality and Word-Formation in Eearly Middle English: The Case of ÆLFRICIAN Texts
Jan Čermák
Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic jan.cermak@ff.cuni.cz

Regarding Animals Regarding Humans
Ruth Parkin-Gounelas
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece gounelas@lit.auth.gr

10.30–11.00 Coffee break + Poster presentations (authors at posters)

11.00–13.00 Seminars, Round tables and PhD sessions

SCULT7, PhD CULT B, RT3, SLITE7 B, SLANG9 B, SLANG6 B, SCULT11 A, SCULT20, SLITE5 A, SLITE8 A, SLITE22, SLITE18, SLANG1 A, SLANG22 A, SLANG14 C

13.00 –14.30 Lunch break
14.30–15.30 Plenary lecture 3

QUESTIONS OF LITERACY: EAST AND WEST
Professor Dr. Martin Montgomery, Universidade de Macau, China

15.30–16.00 Coffee break + Poster presentations (authors at posters)

16.00–17.30 Seminars, Round tables and PhD sessions

PhD LING A, SLITE9 B, RT4, SLANG25, SLANG9 C, SLANG5 A, SCULT11 B, SLITE21, SLITE5 B, SLITE8 B, SLANG21, SLANG27, SLANG1 B, SLANG22 B, SCULT8

17.45–18.45 Proquest special event
Literature Online and Other Resources for Literary Research from ProQuest
Speaker: John Pegum, Senior Product Manager, Humanities at ProQuest

19.00 Visit to the Tokay cellars (see Social Programme)

Monday 1 September 2014 UPJŠ Rectorate and Campus, Šrobárova 2

09.00–18.00 Conference information centre, Rectorate, Senate Meeting Room, 1st Floor
09.30–18.00 Book exhibition
09.30–18.00 Poster presentations (posters only)
11.00, 12.30, 15.00, 16.30 Free guided tour of Košice centre (groups of 20–30 persons, 60 minutes, begins and ends at the Rectorate)

09.30–10.30 Parallel lectures 4

Visual Challenges in Contemporary Poetry: Agon and Enablement
Rui Carvalho Homem
Universidade do Porto, Portugal flup@letras.up.pt

Studies of language, studies on literature: A cognitive rapprochement?
Henryk Kardela
Maria Curie-Skłodowska University in Lublin, Poland henkar@klio.umcs.lublin.pl

History – Drama – Film: Theory and Practice in Cutural Representations of the Medieval Past
György E. Szönyi
University of Szeged & Central European University in Budapest, Hungary geszonyi@freemail.hu

10.30–11.00 Coffee break + Poster presentations (authors at posters)

11.00–13.00 Seminars, Round tables and PhD sessions

RT1, PhD LING B, PhD LIT A, SLITE4 B, SLITE6 A, SLANG11 A, SLANG5 B, SCULT12, SCULT14, SLANG29, SCULT1, SLANG15, SLNAG24 A, SCULT2 A, SLITE13 A

13.00–14.30 Lunch break

14.30–16.30 Seminars, Round tables and PhD sessions

PhD LING C, PhD LIT B, SLITE4 A, SLITE6 B, SLANG11 B, SLANG8 A, SLANG26 A, SLITE20 A, SLITE16 A, SLANG2 A, SLITE14 A, SCULT19 A, SLANG 24B, SCULT2 B, SLITE13 B

16.30–17.00 Coffee break + Poster presentations (authors at posters)

17.00–18.30 Seminars, Round tables, and PhD sessions

PhD LIT C, SCULT4 A, SLITE6 C, SLANG11 C, SLANG8 B, SLANG26 B, SLITE20 B, SLITE16 B, SLANG2 B, SLITE14 B, SCULT19 B, SLANG28, SLANG19

18.45–19:45 ESSE General Assembly with Book Prize Ceremony (Historic Aula, Rectorate, 1st floor)**
20.00 Conference Barbecue, Rectorate

Tuesday 2 September 2014 UPJŠ Rectorate and Campus, Šrobárova 2

09.00 –14.00 Conference information centre, Rectorate, Senate Meeting Room, 1st Floor
09.30–14.00 Book exhibition

09.30–10.30 Parallel lectures 5

Imagining the Fascinating Foreigner: Jane Porter’s Thaddeus of Warsaw (1803) and Thomas Hope’s Anastasius, or Memoirs of a Greek Written at the close of the Eighteen Century (1819)
Ludmilla Kostova
University of Veliko Turnovo, Bulgaria lkostova@mbox.digsys.bg

Politeness in the history of English: From the “courteisie” of the “parfit gentil knight” to the politeness of the Renaissance gentleman
Andreas H. Jucker
University of Zurich, Switzerland ahjucker@es.uzh.ch

Boundaries and the crisis: cultural imaginaries, narratives, and political discourses
Lidia De Michelis
University of Milan, Italy lidia.demichelis@unimi.it

10.30–11.00 Coffee break + Poster presentations (authors at posters)

11.00–13.00 Seminars, Round tables and PhD sessions

RT 2, PhD LIT D, SCULT4 B, SLITE6 D, SLANG3, SLANG8 C, SLANG26 C, SLANG20, SCULT3, SLITE1, SCULT18, SCULT19, SLANG17

13.15–14.00 Closing of the conference:
Feedback from Plenary Speakers
Presentation of ESSE 2016 Galway

PLENARY SPEAKERS

Professor Dr.Fiona Robertson, St Mary's University College, U.K.

http://www.smuc.ac.uk/…obertson.htm

WALTER SCOTT AND THE RESTORATION OF EUROPE

To mark the bicentenary of the publication of Walter Scott’s first novel, Waverley; or, ‘Tis Sixty Years Since in July 1814, this lecture will consider why and how a tale of the 1745 Jacobite rebellion came to redefine historical consciousness across Europe. It will analyse the most important components of Scott’s approach to historical fiction, emphasising his intellectual and artistic subtlety and originality. Taking key ideas from Waverley, the lecture will range across Scott’s works, anchoring his place in a wide European tradition. 2014 is also the year in which Scotland votes for or against independence from the United Kingdom, and so the theme of this lecture is one problematized at the end of Scott’s first novel, ‘restoration’.

The first part of the lecture will reflect on the implications of an intriguing passage in Chapter 4 of Waverley, in which Scott describes family tradition and genealogical history as ‘the very reverse of amber’. This, I argue, is an appropriately thought-provoking, ambiguous starting-point for Scott’s conflicted approach to historical fiction. I then go on to consider the concentrated fantasy of restoration which takes over the final chapter of Waverley, and reflect on the significance of this fantasy in the context of Europe in1814. ‘Restoration’ is a process of giving back, reinstating, re-establishing – bringing back to an earlier condition. As Scott shows, it is a historical impossibility and an aesthetic conundrum. ‘Replenished’, ‘replaced’, ‘renewed or repaired’ – the language of this closing chapter of Waverley draws attention to a difficulty which beset the declared political process of ‘restoration’ in the post-Napoleonic period (by which, for example, the Bourbon line in France was ‘restored’, but as a constitutional monarchy which incorporated the principles of revolutionary change). Of special interest is Scott’s description of how the house and gardens of Tullyveolan have been repaired ‘with the strictest attention to maintain the original character of both, and to erase, as far as possible, all appearance of the ravage they had sustained’.

Restoration – maintenance or erasure? – then directs a reading of Scott’s fictions after Waverley which will focus on the many ways in which Scott reintroduced across Europe a passionate but sceptical engagement with the past and its traces – in folk tradition, legend, the received historical record, buildings, landscapes, artefacts, and the fabric of the state.

Professor Dr. Martin Montgomery, Universidade de Macau, China

http://www.umac.mo/…tgomery.html

QUESTIONS OF LITERACY: EAST AND WEST

It has almost become a cliché to say that we live in a period of unprecedented innovation in the technologies of communication. For sure, the pace of change is rapid; and we can see it most obviously in the changing character of the technical devices that we use on an everyday basis to communicate with each other.

The related rise of personal and social media cannot help but pose questions for us about the nature of the mediated public sphere, about its changing character and about how we access it. What are the dominant genres of the digital era, what kinds of literacies do they presuppose, and how are these re-shaping our older script and print-based literacies?

This talk will draw upon two case studies selected from contrasting mediaspheres, the United States and the People’s Republic of China, to explore the role of digital discourse in micro-blogs on social media platforms as an enactment or extension of the traditional public sphere. In both examples we will see an interaction between old media and new media, since a significant amount of participation in both the U.S. and China comes not just from members of the public but from established journalists accredited to what might be called ‘old’ media news institutions. Each episode, indeed, begins with what might be called an old media event: a televised debate in the US and a news report in the press in the PRC. But in each case the public response is widely dispersed through micro-blogging on social media.

The first case study is based on data from the second presidential debate of the U.S. Presidential Election, 2012, where the Republican candidate, Mitt Romney, made an ill-judged reference to ‘binders full of women’. It explores how the phrase was immediately picked up on Twitter and became the focus for memes and threads in the days that followed. The second case study is based on data from China where a press photograph of a public official looking relaxed at the scene of a fatal accident led to widespread comment amongst China’s netizens, to such an extent that the official not only lost his position (as regional head of work safety), but was subsequently investigated for breaches of party discipline.

A comparison of these two cases leads to reflections on the potentialities of the mediated public sphere in the age of the internet. But it also deals with two kinds of body politic in process in two very different societies. Nonetheless, the comparison throws interesting light on how a similar mediated genre – the micro-blog – can be inflected in different ways and to different ends in the two major societies of our time.

Professor Dr. Mick Short, Lancaster University, U.K.

http://www.research.lancs.ac.uk/…6eb0%29.html

USING Wmatrix TO ANALYSE CHARACTER CONTRASTS (AND THEMES AND FOREGROUNDED MOMENTS) IN BETRAYAL BY HAROLD PINTER

In this paper I will explore the use of a corpus tool called Wmatrix (developed at Lancaster by Dr Paul Rayson) to compare two of the three characters, Jerry and Emma in Betrayal by Harold Pinter. Wmatrix analyses semantic fields in corpora being compared. I will explain in general terms how the tool works and how I used it to compare the speech output of the two characters. In spite of the fact that Wmatrix occasionally mis-assigns lexical items in the play to the wrong semantic fields and, at first sight, the semantic categories highlighted do not seem that interesting, in fact, they are related to important thematic preoccupations in the play.

Wmatrix also seems to point to interestingly to stretches of text that one would want to analyse for other reasons, if doing more traditional stylistic analysis on the play. It also highlighted for me a pattern of ‘somewhat spread’ repetition, which is interesting to consider as it does not seem to be easily accounted for by the traditional foregrounding model.

I will summarise the play (which innovatively starts at the end and works backwards) during my talk, but it will be easier to follow what I have to say if conferees have read the play (or have watched the DVD film of it, which follows the dramatic text closely).

SUB-PLENARY LECTURES

There will be 15 sub-plenary lectures (in parallel sessions with three lectures going on simultaneously).

LLITE1 Saturday 30.8.2014 9.30–10.30

How Trauma Turns into Literature: Romanian-American Writers
Michaela Mudure,
Babes-Bolyai University in Cluj, Romania mmudure@lett.ubbcluj.ro
Technical University of Liberec, Czech Republic mmudure@yahoo.com

Rerouted, derouted, uprooted Romanian-American writers suffer the consequences of leaving their homeland for years after they had made this decision. The specificities of this traumatic move are given by the writers’ personalities and by the historical moment when they leave Romania behind. We shall analyze comparatively the violence of the immigrant travel routes as they appear in the work of three Romanian voices in American literature: Domnica Rădulescu, Alta Ifland, and Petru Popescu. More precisely, we shall focus on Domnica Radulescu and her first novel Train to Trieste, on Petru Popescu’s novel The Deputy, and on Alta Ifland’s collection of short stories Elegy for a Fabulous Land. All these writers were born in Romania and were confronted with totalitarianism and its impositions upon individual identity. For many years escape was the main target of their personal identity politics. We have chosen these authors because they all write fiction and because their personal routes and literary achievements were, for ever, marked by the trauma of leaving Romania and then by the necessity to adapt to American culture.

LLITE2 Monday 1.9.2014 9.30–10.30

Visual Challenges in Contemporary Poetry: Agon and Enablement
Rui Carvalho Homem, Universidade do Porto, Portugal flup@letras.up.pt
http://sigarra.up.pt/…ral.formview?…

This lecture will ponder the ways in which verbal art rises to the challenge posed by pictorial referents by looking into instances of ekphrasis in the work of three poets: Ted Hughes, Seamus Heaney and Sinéad Morrissey. I will predicate this inquiry on an awareness of the argumentative history generated by relations between verbal and visual – a history in which agonistic tropes have characteristically alternated with representations of a peaceful, “‘sisterly’” and benign rapport. My discussion of aspects of the work of Hughes, Heaney and Morrissey will aim to highlight the distinct conformations into which their poetics can bring those ‘“two opposed impulses, two opposed feelings’” that Murray Krieger identified long ago as ruling one’s expectations of how the dynamics of language can tackle the apparent stasis of a visual object: emulation or contrariety? This tension will also be critically articulated with the different ways in which the three poets fashion their authorial personae, a dimension of their writing that appears, at key points, to become closely related to a common fascination with portraits – of themselves, or of surrogate figures. The interest taken by these practitioners of the lyric in the representational possibilities afforded by a pictorial genre, the portrait, which is itself associated with selfhood and individuality will ultimately prompt a discussion of the extent to which the intermedial design can become a source of authorial enablement.

LLITE3 Saturday 30.8.2014 15.45–16.45

Coleridge’s Daemonic Imagination
Gregory M. Leadbetter, Birmingham City University, the UK gregory.leadbetter@bcu.ac.uk
http://www.bcu.ac.uk/…y-leadbetter

Drawing on the arguments presented in my book, Coleridge and the Daemonic Imagination (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), this lecture will describe a new reading of the formative drama at the heart of Coleridge’s poetry and spiritual philosophy.
Beginning with a notebook entry of 1812, in which he applied the enigmatic figure of the ‘“Daemon’” to himself, I will discuss how Coleridge’s obsession with becoming – with ®evolutionary change – blended with his existential and spiritual imperative to know, and to be transfigured by the experience of knowing (for which I employ the term gnosis).
Specifically, Coleridge’s figures of daemonic becoming embody a knowledge of what he called the ‘“transnatural’”. I will summarise how this fascination with the transnatural, in the form of ‘“Metaphysics, Poetry, & ‘“Facts of Mind’”‘, found its mythic voice in the mystery poems of 1797–98: ‘“The Rime of the Ancient Mariner’”, ‘“Christabel’” and ‘“Kubla Khan’”.
Moreover, I will show how this vision did not leave the later Coleridge. His lecture ‘“On the Prometheus of Aeschylus’” (1825) reveals how high the stakes remained: there, he conceives the divine quickening of humankind, the generation of the Nous, or Reason, as a daemonic event, a version of the Fall myth – which in turn echoes the 1812 note on the Daemon and the mythopoesis of 1797–1798, in which Coleridge imagines the becoming of a new order of intelligence, power and being.

LLITE4 Tuesday 2.9.2014 9.30–10.30

Imagining the Fascinating Foreigner: Jane Porter’s Thaddeus of Warsaw (1803) and Thomas Hope’s Anastasius, or Memoirs of a Greek Written at the close of the Eighteen Century (1819)
Ludmilla Kostova, University of Veliko Turnovo, Bulgaria lkostova@mbox.digsys.bg

While a lot has been written about denigrating and/or simplistic constructions of foreign parts and their denizens, literary representations that engage with foreigners in more complex ways and turn them into objects of readerly fascination have received relatively little attention. The proposed lecture attempts to make up for this omission by focusing on the central characters of two nineteenth-century novels. Both texts achieved considerable fame in the past but are mostly of academic interest today.
Jane Porter’s Thaddeus of Warsaw introduced the format of the historical novel into the British context some 11 years before the publication of Scott’s Waverley. Paying close attention to historical details and the specificity of the Polish context, it presents a noble young hero whose chivalric behaviour by far surpasses anything that the novel’s positive English characters can do. In contrast to Porter’s admirable Pole, Thomas Hope’s Anstasius portrays a modern Greek whose behaviour and actions, albeit occasionally amusing, are morally ambiguous and whose chief aim appears to be personal survival in the conditions of a tottering Ottoman empire. Whereas the earlier book exalts heroism and invites sympathy with Poland’s tragic fate, the later one problematizes monologic, hero-centred accounts of national destiny and individual development. Both texts challenge us to re-map the ostensibly familiar terrains of literature and history. Significantly, they do so by representing life in foreign communities and projecting images of fascinating foreigners, thus also inviting us to explore the nature of readerly fascination.

LLite5 Sunday 31.8.2014 9.30 – 10.30

Eschatology and the motif of the vanities in Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice
Line Cottegnies, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3, France line.cottegnies@free.fr
http://www.univ-paris3.fr/…e-29490.kjsp

According to art historian Alain Tapié, emblems of death and vanities constituted an art of memory, a ready-made “thinking machine” for the early-modern Christian. Emblems of death and the iconographical motif of the vanities are rampant in Shakespeare’s plays, most famously perhaps in the graveyard scene in Hamlet or in Richard II’s meditation on the tragic fate of kings. This paper focusses on the presence of such motifs in The Merchant of Venice, where, far from being mere citations of a popular iconographical tradition, they play a structural part. In this paper, I will look at the recurring motif of the vanity in the play, and show that it constitutes a meaningful network of images, all converging to make of Antonio’s mysterious melancholy and his profound death-wish the focus of our attention. Meanwhile, the casket scene will allow us to reflect on the secularization of the motif. This paper will look anew at the play as a sceptical meditation on life and death, manifesting contemporary tensions between Christian eschatology and the rise of capitalistic aspirations.

LLANG1 Tuesday 2.9.2014 9.30–10.30

Politeness in the history of English: From the “courteisie” of the “parfit gentil knight” to the politeness of the Renaissance gentleman
Andreas H. Jucker, University of Zurich, Switzerland ahjucker@es.uzh.ch
http://es-jucker.uzh.ch/
 

In his description of the Renaissance in England, Alexander (2007: 83) talks about the concept of courtesy and its origins.
„How does the new courtesy differ from the medieval ideal? Chaucer’s ‘“parfit gentil Knyght’” is curteis and his Squire has the physical and social skills; the 15th-century princes Charles d’Orléans and James I of Scotland were fine poets; the young King Henry VIII was a champion athlete who composed songs and motets, and also wrote a treatise in Latin. The Renaissance gentleman was more consciously Christian, more highly educated, more skilled in speech.“
In the thirteenth and fourteenth century, the English language had been heavily influenced by French, and it was at that time that a considerable number of courtesy related vocabulary, such as courteous, courteously, graciously, hende, and the distinction between ye and thou as pronouns of address for one addressee were adopted from French (see Jucker 2012 for an overview). It is plausible to assume that at the same time courtly – or courteous – behaviour was borrowed from the French nobility in England.
During the Renaissance there was another important development in the way that courteous and polite behaviour were conceptualized in England. The term “polite” with the meaning ‘“refined, elegant, scholarly; exhibiting good or restrained taste’ is first attested in the English language in c 1500 (OED, “polite”, adj. 2(a)). In 1561 Sir Thomas Hoby published his translation of Baldesar Castiglione’s book Il Cortegiano, originally published in 1528. It is a courtesy book that in a series of fictional conversations describes the perfect courtier, not only in terms of his language but also in terms of behaviour, gestures and bearing. This book had a considerable impact on how the English upper classes conceptualized courteous and polite behaviour, and its influence can clearly be seen in the works by William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson (see Cunningham and Reich 2006: 330).
In this presentation, I shall contrast the Middle English concept of courtesy in Chaucer and in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight with the Renaissance concept of politeness in Shakespeare and in Jonson. It turns out that Middle English courtesy can best be described as deference politeness (Jucker 2012), while Early Modern English is characterised by a concern for positive politeness (in the sense of Brown and Levinson 1987).

References
Alexander, Michael. (2007) A History of English Literature. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Macmillan Palgrave.
Brown, Penelope, and Stephen C. Levinson.(1987) Politeness. Some Universals in Language Usage (Studies in Interactional Sociolinguistics 4). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Cunningham, Lawrence S., and John J. Reich. (2006) Cultures and Values: A Survey of Humanities. Belmont, CA.: Thomson Wadsworth.
Jucker, Andreas H. (2012) Changes in politeness cultures. In: Terttu Nevalainen and Elizabeth Traugott (eds). The Oxford Handbook of the History of English. New York: Oxford University Press, 422–433.

LLANG2 Saturday 30.8.2014 9.30–10.30

Can we arrive at an agreement on the compound status?
Stanislav Kavka, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia ca348439@tiscali.cz
 

The concept of compound is usually judged in the context of individual languages. The expression referred to as a ‘“compound’” in one language does not have to be ranked as a compound in another language. For good measure, there is a variety of relations existing within the expressions, both on the formal and the semantic levels; and the degree of variety will certainly differ in different languages, too.
In the belief that it is possible to find a common denominator for the compound concept I basically agree with those who regard compounds as a specific category of idiomatic expressions, be it collocations or genuine idioms; compounds, like idiomatic expressions, are highly conventionalized and context-bound, representing an ingenious ‘“texture’” of interrelations. These must be viewed, on one axis at least, as a continuum, a gradient, and on the other axis as a movement from the literal to the figurative reading. It is here that certain characteristic features shared by idiomatic expressions and compounds should be considered, such as compositionality (the product of the continual complex interplay of variability and literalness), and indivisibility (which is not synonymous to non-compositionality!). What I also believe in is the fact of continuity, or ‘“fluidity’”: the given expression can be limited in its variability, grows less literal, and as time passes, it becomes fixed and conventionalized in its new, figurative meaning. In other words, a junction of originally independent lexemes travels, as it were, along the scale of compositionality: the less compositional the given expression is, the more justifiable it is to call it a compound.
All these theses will be explained and illustrated by examples from Czech, German, and Spanish, with special emphasis on English prototypical ‘“compounds’” showing a cline: playground – stone-fish – lifeboat – red carpet – greybeard – white lie.

LLANG3 Sunday 31.8.2014 9.30 – 10.30

Lexical Mortality and Word-Formation in Eearly Middle English: The Case of ÆLFRICIAN Texts
Jan Čermák, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic jan.cermak@ff.cuni.cz
http://uajd.ff.cuni.cz/cermak

The Middle English word has been aptly described as torn between domestic and foreign, spoken and written, traditional and innovative domains. Against the backdrop of this competition, developments in derivational morphology appear to be less progressive than those in inflexional morphology. In the typology of Early Middle English word-formation, decreasing introflection goes hand in hand with diminishing inflection. Derivation as a word-formation strategy begins to employ fewer prefixes and suffixes (this decrease is to be compensated by borrowing from French and Latin later in the Middle English and Early Modern English periods). In the domain of suffixes, those of a more agglutinating nature (i.e. heavy-built, usually syllabic formatives) tend to prevail over those of a lighter, non-syllabic and typologically inflectional character. Lexical mortality has a devastating effect on a vocabulary organized on the etymological principle (Mathesius 1939–40) or associative principle (Kastovsky 1992).
Combining lexicographic and textual analysis in the framework of language typology, the talk will trace several structural tendencies in the demise of Old English vocabulary in Early Middle English. Comparing the evidence provided by electronic The Dictionary of Old English (A‒G) and The Middle English Dictionary (under the Middle English Compendium) with material from the corpus of Early Middle English copies of (mainly) homilies by Ælfric of Eynsham (ca. 955 – ca. 1010), attention will be paid to the interaction between lexical losses (in nouns, adjectives and verbs) and the marginalisation of some of the word-formation patterns employing typological introflection (mainly ablaut and mutations) and suffixes of an inflectional, rather than agglutinating, character. The processes described will be shown to testify to small, slow, gradual but perceptible beginnings in word-formation of the well-known large-scale typological reshaping of English in the course of its history from inflection (synthesis) to isolation (analysis).

References
Dictionary of Old English. A–G on CD-Rom (2008). The Dictionary of Old English, University of Toronto.
McSparran F. (ongoing). The Middle English Compendium. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Digital Library
Production Service. Retrieved from http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/mec/.
Kastovsky, D. (1992), “Semantics and Vocabulary”, in: Hogg, R. M. (ed.), The Cambridge History of the
English Language. Volume I: The Beginnings to 1066, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 290–409.

LLANG4 Monday 1.9.2014 9.30–10.30

Studies of language, studies on literature: A cognitive rapprochement?
Henryk Kardela, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University in Lublin, Poland henkar@klio.umcs.lublin.pl
https://umcs.lublin.pl/pracownicy.php?…

Set in the context of the (inter)subjectivity research pursued in the general paradigm of cognitive science, the presentation undertakes to discuss the merits of cognitive theory in both linguistic and literary studies. Assuming, as cognitive linguistic and literary theorists do, that meaning and (text)interpretation emerge from a discourse or a text as a result of the speaker-hearer meaning negotiation process or through the reader’s interaction with the text (and with the author), respectively, we claim that the cognitive paradigm opens new vistas in both modern linguistic theory and literary analysis and thus can successfully replace the self limiting main-stream (generative) theory of language on the one hand and the (post) structuralist reader-oriented approach to literary analysis (Barthes 1967/1986, Eco 1962/1989) on the other. In particular, it is claimed that the (inter)subjectivity-related research pursued in the cognitive paradigm (cf. Zlatev et al. 2008), when placed in the framework of Ronald Langacker’s cognitive grammar (Langacker 2000, 2007, 2008) and combined with the theory of cognitive narratology (cf. Stockwell 2002, Semino and Culpeper 2002, Claassen 2012, Dancygier 2012), is capable of offering a common ground for the two strands of research to meet and thus allows for a uniform linguistic-literary textual analysis to be carried out.

References
Barthes, Roland. 1967/1986. The Rustle of Language. Trans. by Richard Howard, Berkeley: University of California Press.
Dancygier, Barbara. 2012. The Language of Stories. A Cognitive Approach. Cambridge: CUP.
Eco, Umberto. 1962/1989. The Open Work. Trans. by Anna Cancogni. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
Langacker, Ronald. 2000. Grammar and Conceptualization. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
Langacker, Ronald. 2007. Constructing the Meaning of Personal Pronouns. In: G. Radden, K-M Koepcke, T. Berg, P. Siemund (eds.) Aspects of Meaning Construction. Amsterdam: Benjamins, 171–187.
Langacker, Ronald. 2008. Cognitive Grammar. A Basic Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Semino, Elena, Jonathan Culpeper (eds.) 2002. Cognitive Stylistics. Language and Cognition in Text Analysis. Amsterdam: Benjamins.
Stockwell, Peter. 2002. Cognitive Poetics. An Introduction. London: Routledge.
Zlatev, Jordan, Timothy Racine, Chris Sinha, Esa Itkonen. 2008. The Shared Mind. Perspectives on Intersubjectivity. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

LLANG5 Saturday 30.8.2014 15.45–16.45

“I tell you this, because I come from your country”. The popularization of science and the linguistic construction of reliability in nineteenth-century travelogues and ego documents
Marina Dossena, Università degli Studi di Bergamo, Italy marina.dossena@unibg.it
http://www.unibg.it/…truttura.asp?…

According to the statistics on the website of the Oxford English Dictionary, more lexical items were first recorded in the nineteenth century than at any other time in the history of English; they mostly reflect the scientific discoveries, technical innovations and social and political novelties that characterized those decades, and they provide a clear indication of our indebtedness to Late Modern times. In addition, the changes that occurred in nineteenth-century English vocabulary are a function of the way in which new information was made available to the reading public: magazines and circulating libraries opened windows onto new worlds which elicited curiosity and the desire to know more, thus encouraging more publications. Also, the reports published in periodicals (or indeed presented as objective background descriptions in novels) could be supplemented with the narratives found in the letters sent home by emigrants, who strove to illustrate their new reality to readers who could only imagine such unfamiliar settings. Consequently, travelogues, autobiographies, letters and diaries make up a valuable set of documents by means of which we can investigate how geographical, geological and anthropological knowledge was popularized.
In my talk I intend to discuss how description, narration and evaluation appear to interact in texts pertaining to the representation of North America. This transatlantic perspective is in line with recent methodologies in diachronic studies of English, and its interest in popular writing is consistent with current trends in historical sociolinguistics. Specific attention will be given to Scottish texts, on account of their value in the transatlantic diaspora. My investigation will therefore centre on materials currently available in the Corpus of Modern Scottish Writing, the Corpus of Nineteenth-century Scottish Correspondence, and other digital repositories, such as the Internet Library of Early Journals and the online collections of the National Library of Scotland.

LCULT1 Monday 1.9.2014 9.30–10.30

History – Drama – Film: Theory and Practice in Cutural Representations of the Medieval Past
György E. Szönyi, University of Szeged & Central European University in Budapest, Hungary geszonyi@freemail.hu
http://history.ceu.hu/…yorgy_szonyi

A common observation is that while our students tend to read less and less, courses on visual representations, especially “film studies”, have greatly increased in popularity. This student interest is only one symptom related to the rise of visual cultural studies: we cannot fail to notice that nowadays the scholarly examination of films as cultural representations has caught up with the practice of literary analyses. This relatively young but increasingly vigorous subdiscipline has reshaped the proportions within English Studies as well, and by today it has its own scholarly output with numberless monographs and significant periodicals. Within the subdiscipline of film studies, an equally fast-growing field is the study of historical films. But even within this sub-discipline there have emerged topical sub-sub-areas, such as the study of filmic representations of the Middle Ages. Examples are John Aberth’s A Knight at the Movies (2003), or Andrew Elliott’s Remaking the Middle Ages (2011).
In my lecture I will briefly survey the historiography of the study of historical films, while in the second part I will offer a few case studies in which films used various source materials, such as dramas of high literary quality (Shakespeare in Laurence Olivier’s and Kenneth Branagh’s Henry V); little known medieval romances (Mel Gibson’s Braveheart); or occasion-prompted contemporary scripts (such as Ridley Scott’s 1492, The Conquest of Paradise, on the 500th anniversary of Colombus’s discovery). My case studies prove that there is no historical film which does not have a political or ideological agenda, thus speaking directly to the present. As Robert Burgoyne formulated it in 2008: “The historical film provides an emotional connection to history in a way that foregrounds the power and importance of the past in shaping the cultural imagery in the present” (The Hollywood Historical Film, 48).

LCULT2 CANCELLED

“Faust and the Credit Crunch”
Patrick Lonergan, National University of Ireland in Galway, Ireland patrick.lonergan@nuigalway.ie
http://www.nuigalway.ie/…onergan.html

In this lecture, I will embark on an exploration of how the global credit crunch has been met by a significant increase in new work that draws on the Faust motif, often directly taken from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Mann, etc. I will include new drama by writers such as the Irish playwrights Conor McPherson and Marina Carr, as well as the American dramatist David Mamet and the Scottish dramatist David Greig. I will also examine new American television series such as Mad Men, Damages and Breaking Bad. I see those works as direct responses to our changing understanding of issues such as indebtedness and austerity.

LCULT2 NEW LECTURE! Tuesday 2.9.2014 9.30–10.30

Boundaries and the crisis: cultural imaginaries, narratives, and political discourses
Lidia De Michelis, University of Milan, Italy lidia.demichelis@unimi.it
http://www.unimi.it/…rsonaXML.jsp?…

While the discourse of neo-liberalism has been a privileged area of investigation in critical discourse analysis (Fairclough 2012) and cultural studies (Hall) since the 1980s, the dominant cultural scripts and idioms produced, and disseminated, by mediated political representations in order to define the current financial crisis have emerged over the last years as a growing concern in the interconnected domains of political communication, critical theory, critical sociology, media and discourse studies. Recently, these issues have gained increasing circulation and urgency also among scholars in the fields of literary and critical cultural studies (Grossberg), as is demonstrated by the number of conferences, books, and special issues devoted to these themes.
Disaster, meltdown, breakdown, collapse, are only a few of the “catastrophic” terms deployed by political and media discourse in order to describe the current crisis. Another equally popular cluster highlights notions of illness and viral contagion (sometimes occurring in its heightened version as “invasion”). Interestingly, most of these words entail an erosion, loss, contamination, or malign violation, of widely accepted and naturalized boundaries and cultural models. This same ability to bring about a “tearing down” of boundaries is, according to Beck (2006: 2), a defining characteristic of the global risk paradigm. Spectrality, and the haunting of the neo-liberal way of life by past economic choices form another salient metaphorical area. Conversely, according to critical media and discourse theory, hegemonic boundary-drawing is an essential constituent of political discourse, even though this process is usually obfuscated through ideological practices. Lastly, as is well known, “judging”, but also “separating” (which again evokes the erecting of boundaries), are among the etymological meanings of “crisis”, and “criticism”, to the point that Paul de Man (1983 [1967]) could maintain that “all true criticism occurs in the mode of crisis” (see Crosthwaite 2011: 1–11).
Drawing on a range of interconnected approaches, but privileging a cultural studies perspective, my presentation investigates cultural imaginaries, and literary and political narratives of the crisis, according to the interfacing conceptual categories of “boundary-drawing” (and the “trespassing of boundaries”), and representation. Building on recent scholarship, such as, among others, Hayward (2012), Mahony and Clarke (2012), Grossberg (2010), and Crosthwaite (2011), I shall rely on novels, essays, films and discourses in an attempt to make meaning of what Stuart Hall and Doreen Massey (2013: 55) have recently defined a “conjuncture”, “a period when different social, political, economic and ideological contradictions that are at work in society and have given it a specific and distinctive shape come together, producing a crisis of some kind”. In this essay, their notion of conjuncture is directly indexed to an analysis of Thatcher and Thatcherism. In the light of Margaret Thatcher recent passing away, and the enduring divisive impact of her image, this link opens a window onto the issue of iconicity and the crisis, and allows for a diachronic perspective on the crisis of neo-liberalism.

References:
Beck, Ulrich, Cosmopolitan Vision, Cambridge, Polity Press, 2006.
Crosthwaite, Paul, ed., Criticism, Crisis, and Contemporary Narrative, London, Routledge, 2011.
Fairclough, Isabela, and Norman Fairclough. 2012. Political Discourse Analysis: A method for advanced students. London and New York: Routledge.
Grossberg, Lawrence, “Modernity and Commensuration”, Cultural Studies, 24, 3 (2010): 295–332.
Grossberg, Lawrence, Cultural Studies in the Future Tense, Durham, NC, Duke University Press.
Hall, Stuart, and Doreen Massey, “Interpreting the Crisis”, in Rutherford, Jonathan, and Sally
Mahony, Nick, and John Clarke, “Public Crises, Public Futures”, Cultural Studies, iFirst article (2012), pp. 1–22.
Marsh, Nicky, Money, Speculation, and Finance in Contemporary British Fiction, London, Continuum, 2007.
Woodmansee, Martha, and Mark Osteen, eds, The New Economic Criticism: Studies at the Intersection of Literature and Economics, London, Routledge, 1999.

LCULT3 Sunday 31.8.2014 9.30 – 10.30

Regarding Animals Regarding Humans
Ruth Parkin-Gounelas, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece gounelas@lit.auth.gr
http://www.enl.auth.gr/…f/parkin.htm

In one of his late works, Jacques Derrida recreates a haunting scene in which he stands naked in the bathroom before the gaze of a cat, experiencing both its ‘intolerable proximity’ and the ‘absolute alterity’ of its point of view. Animals, he notes, have long been made a ‘theorem’, something seen but not seeing. To be confronted by their gaze, in your nakedness, is to face up to ‘the abyssal limits of the human’, to require ‘another thinking of life’.
With Derrida’s late seminars as a point of departure, the lecture will explore ways in gouwhich contemporary disciplines from ethology and cognitive neuroscience to biopolitics and the philosophy of mind are unsettling definitions of human subjectivity circumscribed since the Enlightenment to exclude other animals. The effect of much of this work has been the increasing erosion of the distinctions humans have awarded themselves in relation to other animals (speech, reason, the capacity to lie, to constitute oneself as an ‘I’, to have a relation to death ‘as such’, etc.). The need for new definitions of the human, it will be suggested, is shifting attention away from subjective individualisation towards modes of being which incorporate multiplicity, expropriation and the involuntary: Deleuze and Guattari’s ‘collective assemblages’, Agamben’s ‘whatever singularity’, Derrida’s ‘automaticity’. Examples from literature (Kafka, Coetzee, Dickinson, Hopkins, Hughes) will be given to illustrate the tensions and dislocations produced by the encroachment of the animal, with its uncanny proximity and alterity, upon the human domain.

LCult4 Saturday 30.8.2014 15.45–16.45

(Child)reign of Terror: Dangerous Child Régimes
Björn Sundmark, Malmö University, Sweden bjorn.sundmark@mah.se
http://forskning.mah.se/en/id/lubjsu

One of the cornerstones of the social order is the asymmetrical power relationship between the adult and the child. The details may differ, but essentially power and responsibility should be the prerogative of the adult, whereas dependence and obedience should necessarily be the lot of the child. If these fundamentals are altered or challenged, the social order itself is threatened. This is no doubt why, for instance, Neil Postman’s The Disappearance of Childhood (1982) strikes such an alarmist note: if childhood as we know it is disappearing, is not our entire society on the brink of collapse? Conversely, Robert Bly’s The Sibling Society (1996) identifies the societal problems facing western societies with a lack of mature adults, where no one wants to be responsible, and life should be an extended teen ride. In other words, if either the adult category or the child category is taken out of the equation, the social order collapses. Furthermore, on another level, such a breakdown leads – at least temporarily – to the concept of child and/or adult being cast out of the symbolic order; that is, they become Kristeva’s abject, or the uncanny (in Freud’s parlance), or taboo (to use a Lévi-Straussian term). In fictional responses to such anxieties we find stories about changelings, or children who are possessed, or monstrous in other ways. What concerns me in this paper, however, is not abject individuals, but fictions where the social contract between the child and the adult has been irreparably broken, and where children have established their own regimes. Specifically, I am going to analyze Stephen King’s short story “Children of the Corn” (1977), and “The Enemy” (2009-), a series of zombie apocalypse-books by Charlie Higson.

LCULT5 Saturday 30.8.2014 9.30–10.30

A Life Sentence: Twenty Years of Convict Studies Research and the Female Factory Research Group, Tasmania
Susan Ballyn, University of Barcelona, Spain susan.ballyn@gmail.com

In 1990 I was library fossicking and found references to free Spanish settlers in Australia in the early nineteenth century. It was then I began to think about the possibility that there might have been Spanish convicts as well. I was unaware I was about to discover an academic goldmine which has guided my research since then. Trawling through convict documents led me to look at Spanish, Portuguese, and Hispanic convicts together with Sephardic Jews and their descendents. Soon, I discovered the only extant biography of a Spanish convict: Adelaide de la Thoreza. This began a new research track which has lasted until today.
My research has become part of that done by the Female Convicts Research Centre (FCRC), Tasmania, in which interdisciplinary researchers and family genealogists have come together enabling the international profiling of convict studies, in particular female convicts transported to Tasmania. The FCRC stands at the cutting edge of its field and exemplifies how interdisciplinarity of expertise is absolutely necessary in researching any material in this area. The extraordinary database set up by the FCRC and the wealth of documentation it contains is now part of UNESCO´s Memory of the World Register; Australia, together with the recognition of UNESCO World Heritage awarded to the Convict sites extant in Tasmania today.
The FCRC has enabled the reconstruction of convicts’ biographies from the time of conviction, or before, to their deaths and their descendents, where possible. In this presentation I would like to trace a map of where
I am now with my research and how on my journey of enquiry with the FCRC surprising elements have come to light. I would like to highlight how working with this group of researchers has led me to a point of committed interdisciplinarity which is the hallmark of Cultural Studies

SPECIAL EVENTS

Reading by James Robertson, a Scottish writer who grew up in Bridge of Allan, Stirlingshire. He is the author of several short story and poetry collections, and has published five novels: The Fanatic, Joseph Knight, The Testament of Gideon Mack, And the Land Lay Still, and The Professor of Truth. The Testament of Gideon Mack was long-listed for the 2006 Man Booker Prize. Robertson also runs an independent publishing company called Kettillonia, and is a co-founder (with Matthew Fitt and Susan Rennie) and general editor of the Scots language imprint Itchy Coo, which produces books in Scots for children and young people.

Special Round Table Saturday 30.8.2014 11.00–13.00

INCREASING THE VISIBILITY OF GENDER STUDIES,EUROPEANIZING GENDER STUDIES
Convenors:
Renate Haas, University of Kiel, Germany, haas@anglistik.uni-kiel.de
Işil Baş, Boğaziçi University Istanbul, Turkey, isil@boun.edu.tr
Maria Socorro Suárez, Universidad de Oviedo, lafuente@uniovi.es

Anglicist Gender Studies has seen a remarkable development, in some places a simply brilliant one. Its visibility, nevertheless, leaves much to be desired, and the economic crisis has often entailed serious cuts. The panel, therefore, focuses on the question of how Gender Studies can be better established by energizing European connections, including connections within the context of ESSE. The question can and will be addressed on 1) an organizational-practical level and 2) on a theoretical level.
In order to start the discussion on the first level, several possibilities will be presented briefly (e.g. a Women’s Caucus, a Gender Studies Corner on the ESSE homepage, an ESSE Gender Studies Award). A concise survey of what has already proved particularly effective in national or local contexts may also be useful.
On the second level, a short presentation will be made with its starting points in the fact that equality opportunities and gender diversity have become a crucial European project (and not only in politics), and the idea that the discipline dealing with the continent’s main lingua franca can play a more important role in these processes than it has played so far.
The aim is for a lively discussion with tangible results.

Proquest Special Event Sunday 31.8.2014 17.45–18.45

Literature Online and Other Resources for Literary Research from ProQuest
Speaker:
John Pegum, Senior Product Manager, Humanities at ProQuest

ROUND TABLES

The list of speakers for each round table has already been proposed by its convenor(s). In round tables the convenor chairs the session and the participants discuss scholarly or professional topics of wide general interest. Round table topics are therefore geared to encouraging audience participation.

RT1 Monday 1.9.2014 11.00–13.00

BIOGRAPHY THEORY
Convenor:
Joanny Moulin, Aix-Marseille University, France, joanny.moulin@univ-amu.fr
Participants:
J. W. (Hans) Renders, University of Groningen, The Netherlands, j.w.renders@rug.nl
Christian Klein, University of Wuppertal, Germany, chklein@uni-wuppertal.de

Biography, considered as both an object and a method of research, has gradually gathered impetus, so much so that it is now emerging on the international academic scene as a field of study in its own right. This results from a convergence of historical factors, among which the development of life writing, but also a growing interest for the biographic in history and the social sciences. The current debate revolves around the elaboration of a theory of biography, which is bound to distinguish its aims and methods from those of collateral disciplines, although it can only proceed from transdisciplinary dialogues.

RT2 Tuesday 2.9.2014 11.00–13.00

CULTURAL STUDIES APPROACHES IN THE STUDY OF EAST EUROPEAN CINEMA
Convenor: Andrea Virgnás, Sapientia University, Romania, avirginas@gmail.com
Participants:
György Kalmár, University of Debrecen, Hungary, gykalmar@yahoo.com
Zsolt Győri, University of Debrecen, Hungary, gyorizs@yahoo.co.uk

Our round table discussion introduces the interdisciplinary research methods of cultural studies into the field of Eastern European screen studies, with special attention to post-communist cinema and television. Our comparative explorations are partly based on the study of significant materials from British, American, Hungarian, Romanian, Czech, and Serbian audiovisual archives. We strongly believe that the transnational tendencies of Central and Eastern European screen cultures, as discussed by Dina Iordanova and others in connection with finance, production, distribution, reception, etc. may be fruitfully introduced – as the monographs and edited volumes of Anikó Imre demonstrate – in the study of such contemporary social phenomena: the screen is studied for the representation of minorities, genders, subcultures and communities carrying the traumatic wounds of the past.

RT3 Sunday 31.8.2014 11.00–13.00

LITERARY JOURNALISM: EXPLAINING SECOND CITIES TO THEMSELVES
Convenors:
John S. Bak, Université de Lorraine, France, john.bak@univ-nancy2.fr
David Abrahamson, Northwestern University, U.S.A, d-abrahamson@northwestern.edu
Participants:
Norman Sims, University of Massachusetts, U.S.A., sims@honors.umass.edu
Lisa A. Phillips, State University of New York, U.S.A., Brazil, phillipl@newpaltz.edu
Mateus Yuri Passos, Universida de Estadual de Campinas, mateus.passos@gmail.com
Pablo Calvi, Ithaca College, U.S.A., pcalvi@ithaca.edu
Mateusz Zimnoch, Jagiellonian University, Poland, mateusz.zimnoch@gmail.com

The idea of the nation-state remains compelling, and with it the role of the capital city as the centre of a nation’s political, economic, intellectual, sociocultural and religious life. Yet the concept of the second city – Chicago to New York, Manchester to London, even Košice to Bratislava – has been both a robust theme and a critical setting in much literary journalism, a genre of nonfiction prose that lies at conceptual intersection of literature and journalism. The proposed session will focus on the ways in which literary journalism has encountered and employed “second city-dom,” with particular emphasis on how various representations have explicated notions of identity, ideology and values, as well as the resulting tension between belonging-ness and other-ness.

RT4 Sunday 31.8.2014 16.00–17.30

DEBATES ON WORLD LITERATURE
Convenor:
Jon Cook, University of East Anglia, U.K., J.Cook@uea.ac.uk
Participants:
Herbert Grabes, University of Giessen, Germany, herbert.grabes@anglistik.uni-giessen.de
Jan Borm, University of Versailles, France, jan.borm@uvsq.fr
Regina Rudaityte, University of Vilnius, Lithuania, reginarudaityte@hotmail.com

In this session we will map some of the recent critical interventions in the renewed debate about the nineteenth century idea of a world literature. These will include the analysis of world literature as a distinctive mode of literary circulation and its characterisation as a highly competitive race for “literary legitimacy”, one that now threatens the very idea of a distinct realm of literary value. We will take up the question of the role of translation in the development of world literature and address the possibility that the trend towards literary globalisation, far from abolishing an engagement with national and local literatures is, in fact, renewing interest in them.

RT5 Saturday 30.8.2014 11.00–13.00

THE TRACE OF THE VICTORIANS IN CONTEMPORARY CULTURE: A REASSESSMENT
Convenor:
Rosario Arias Doblas, University of Málaga, Spain, rarias@uma.es
Participants:
Rosario Arias, University of Málaga, Spain, rarias@uma.es
Maria Grazia Nicolosi, University of Catania, Italy, mariagrazia.nicolosi@tin.it
Roberta Gefter Wondrich, University of Trieste, Italy, gefter@units.it
Sonia Villegas López, University of Huelva, Spain, villegas@dfing.uhu.es
Monika Pietrzak-Franger, TU Braunschweig, Germany, m.pietrzak-franger@tu-braunschweig.de

Over the last few years the “trace” has acquired an important place in many critical discourses. Exceeding the philosophical domain, whence it emerged as a fascinating notion for Emmanuel Levinas, Jacques Derrida and Paul Ricoeur, this concept has proved to be compelling in Neo-Victorian Studies. In Seminar 12 at the Istanbul ESSE Conference, the “trace” yielded suggestive insights into the fluid relationship between the Victorians and us, inflecting in original ways critical categories like spectrality and adaptation. This round table will test out the relevance of the “trace” for the analysis of contemporary literary and cultural interventions into the Victorian age.

RT6 Saturday 30.8.2014 11.00–13.00

THE SHORT STORY IN EUROPE
Convenors:
Ailsa Cox, Edge Hill University, UK, ailsa.cox@edgehill.ac.uk
Michelle Ryan-Sautour, University of Angers, France, michelle.ryan-sautour@univ-angers.fr
Participants:
Michael Basseler, University of Giessen, Germany, Michael.Basseler@anglistik.uni-giessen.de
Jim Hinks, European Short Story Network, www.theshortstory.eu, and Edge Hill University, UK, jim.hinks@commapress.co.uk
Alison MacLeod, University of Chichester UK, and Thresholds short story forum, http://blogs.chi.ac.uk/shortstoryforum

European scholarship has promoted research into the short story form, both during a time of relative neglect and during its much-vaunted revival in the 21st century – especially through journals such as the Journal of the Short Story in English (founded 1983); through regular conferences dedicated to the form; and through many other European-based initiatives, including festivals, publications and online resources. This panel consists of individuals who have been at the forefront of these initiatives, and launches ENSFR, the European Network for Short Fiction Research. We’ll be discussing the specific contribution of European-based research, both theoretical and practice-based, to short fiction research in the 21st century.

POSTER SESSIONS

Another feature of the 12th ESSE conference will be the poster sessions. A poster is a short, concise, highly accessible description of new, unpublished research mounted on a poster stand for public viewing. Posters typically include not only text (approx. 2,000 words) but also graphs, photographs, and charts. Posters should be no bigger than 120 cm in width x 150 cm in height.

Posters may address topics specifically connected to the conference seminars, round tables, and lectures, or any other specialized topic in the field of English Studies. The aim of a poster session is to provide conference participants, and poster presenters in particular, with additional opportunities for discussion and feedback about research in an informal setting. Therefore, presenters are strongly encouraged to be present during the poster session and to have handouts available for distribution.

DOCTORAL SESSIONS

Young scholars who are writing their PhD theses in English Studies and are at least in the second year of their studies at the time of ESSE Conference in Košice will make a brief presentation of their work-in-progress at one of three doctoral sessions in the fields of English Language, Literatures in English, and Cultural and Area Studies. These presentations should deal with the issues addressed or hypotheses tested in the thesis, the results so far obtained, and above all the methodology applied, with the purpose of gaining feedback from peers and established scholars in the field. Each presentation will last 10 minutes, followed by 15 minutes’ discussion.

Each workshop will be coordinated by two international experts, who will act as co-convenors and will make a selection from the applications received. Note that PhD students attending the doctoral sessions may attend the full ESSE Conference at a reduced fee. Presentation at a doctoral session is not incompatible with participating in and presenting at other seminars at the Conference.

The overall organiser of the doctoral sessions: Professor J. Lachlan Mackenzie
(VU University Amsterdam, NL and ILTEC, PT), lachlan_mackenzie@hotmail.com

Co-convenors for the different fields of research:
English Language:
Prof. Mark Aronoff, Stony Brook University, NY, USA, mark.aronoff@stonybrook.edu
Prof. Cornelia Ilie, Zayed University, United Arab Emirates, cornelia.ilie@gmail.com

Literatures in English:
Prof. Martin Procházka (Czech Republic) martin.prochazka@ff.cuni.cz
Prof. Dominic Rainsford (Denmark) dominic.rainsford@hum.au.dk

Cultural and Area Studies:
Prof. John Corbett (Scotland UK/Macao PRC) JCorbett@umac.mo
Prof. Michael Parsons (France) michael.parsons@univ-pau.fr

SEMINARS

Literature

SLITE1 Tuesday 2.9.2014 11.00–13.00

THE CHANGING REPRESENTATION OF THE JEWISH FAMILY IN JEWISH AMERICAN LITERATURE
Convenors:
Stanislav Kolář, University of Ostrava, Czech Republic, stanislav.kolar@osu.cz
Zuzana Buráková, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, zuzana.burakova@upjs.sk

Due to the profound sociocultural changes that have affected the lives of American Jews, the traditional Jewish family has undergone a rapid transition which has resulted in the need for a more contemporary conceptualization of the Jewish family and consequently of Jewish identity within the context of American literature. We encourage proposals that address our topic from the perspective of class, gender, ethnicity, religion, memory, trauma and Holocaust studies.

SLITE2 Saturday 30.8.2014 (A)11.00–13.00, (B)17.15–18.45

REVISITING THE NATION IN POST-WAR MODERNIST LITERATURE
Convenors:
Armela Panajoti, University of Vlora “Ismail Qemali”, Albania, armelap@assenglish.org
Adrian Radu, Babes-Bolyai University, Romania, adrian.radu@ubbcluj.ro

The aim of this seminar is to explore the concept of nation, subsequent and adjacent constructions of identity and, more generally, whatever is related from this perspective to the modernist literature of the post-war period. Therefore, the seminar sets out to look into national identity as a form of collective identity and give an answer to the question about what we make of the group, of the whole, of the collective, of the nation in a period when the individual less than the group is more and more placed in the centre of attention.

SLITE3 Saturday 30.8.2014 (A) 11.00–13.00, (B)17.15–18.45

INTERMEDIAL BODY POLITICS: TOWARDS A FEMINIST ANALYSIS OF IMAGE/TEXT DYNAMICS
Convenors:
Anna Kérchy, University of Szeged, Hungary, akerchy@gmail.com
Catriona McAra, University of Edinburgh, UK, cmcara@staffmail.ed.ac.uk

The seminar aims to explore intermedial interactions between literary and visual representations of the female body relying on the assumption that the conceptual shift implied in the dialectical, dialogic trope of word and image (i.e. the mixed-media image/text dynamics) entails a challenge to binary oppositions’ hegemonic logic, and hence provides an adequate means for the self-reflective expression of heterogeneously embodied, polyphonically voiced, kaleidoscopically envisioned feminine subjectivities-in-progress. We perform an interdisciplinary wedding of semiotics to corporeal feminism, of literary theory to readings in visual arts, and of iconography to revisionary interpretations of literature; unveil how the semioticization of female bodies affects the somatization of texts and images; and aim to offer a gender-sensitive analysis of topics like the textual value of illustrations, pictures collaged inside literary texts, the figurativeness of lyrical language and the materiality of signifiers.

SLITE4 Monday 1.9.2014 (B)11.00–13.00, (A)14.30–16.30

THE FICTION OF VICTORIAN MASCULINITIES AND FEMININITIES
Convenors:
Elisabetta Marino, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy, Marino@lettere.uniroma2.it
Adrian Radu, Babes-Bolyai University, Romania, adrian.radu@ubbcluj.ro

Victorian culture is essentially a patriarchal one in an age of male dominance. But it also contains the expression of female emancipation and assertion of equal rights with men and equity in legal, educational, professional, and personal aspects of life. This seminar aims at exploring Victorian literature from the perspective of gender, gender roles and representation and to provide an opportunity to discuss the literary output of Victorian male and female writers, the specific depiction of genders, the way writers, works, individual characters include conventional representations of both sexes, but also reflect the changes in attitude that this age contained.

SLITE5 Sunday 31.8.2014 (A)11.00–13.00, (B)16.00–17.30

INVESTING IN TIME: LITERATURE, CULTURE AND PERIODIZATION
Convenors:
Mihaela Irimia, University of Bucharest, Romania, irimia.mihaela@clicknet.ro
Jukka Tiusanen, University of Vaasa, Finland, jukka.tiusanen@uwasa.fi

We propose for this seminar a discussion of how centuries, still fairly coherent units of time, have experienced their ups and downs, their cuttings short like the twentieth century and expansions like the long eighteenth century, their re-readings and reevaluations, been invested with value and new life or like currencies being shorted or sold long. We encourage discussions of the commercial value of culture and literature, and the changes that have resulted from re-evaluations of the currency of time and period. Contributors are encouraged to discuss how our sense of period affects the present debate on the discourses of modernity.
 

SLITE6 Monday 1.9.2014 (A) 11.00–13.00,(B) 14.30–16.30, ( C )17.00–18.30/ Tuesday 2.9.2014 (D)11.00–13.00

FIGURES AND SITES OF MEMORY IN 19TH- AND 20TH-CENTURY LITERATURE AND CULTURE
Convenors:
Irena Grubica, University of Rijeka, Croatia, igrubica@gmail.com
Tamás Bényei, University of Debrecen, Hungary, tamasbenyei@yahoo.com

By focusing on formative aspects of figures and sites of memory in 19th- and 20th-century literature and culture this seminar will investigate how individual, family, generational, collective, cultural and national memories and strategies of recollection and forgetting inscribe themselves onto the spaces we inhabit, and how spaces become contentious zones for the politics of memory and forgetting. Possible topics may include: monuments, ruins, gardens, landscapes, haunted houses, etc. as sites of memory; urban culture, memory, forgetting and “the practice of everyday life“, history and memory, hysteria, amnesia, museums, archives, cultural memory and identity formation; gender and sites of memory, etc.

SLITE7 Saturday 30.8.2014 (A)11.00–13.00/ Sunday 31.8.2014 (B) 11.00–13.00

FEMALE RITUALS: COOKING AND EATING IN/AND WOMEN’S FICTION
Convenors:
Nóra Séllei, University of Debrecen, Hungary, sellei.nora@arts.unideb.hu
Katarina Labudova, Catholic University in Ružomberok, Slovakia, labudova@ff.ku.sk

Cooking and eating food allow for multiple associations to be swallowed: from the sexual to the spiritual, from the culturally specific to the general, from the domestic to the social and beyond. Food in fiction is also tied up with creativity, serving as a master trope. Consequently, the consumption and rejection of both food and fiction often resonate with metaphors of morality, power and indulgence, and they become essential in the construction of one’s body and identity: you are what you read/eat. We invite papers exploring the pleasures as well as discomforts associated with rituals of cooking/(non-)eating and reading/writing.

SLITE8 Sunday 31.8.2014 (A) 11.00–13.00, (B) 16.00–17.30

NEW VISIBILITIES: THE RHETORICAL AND POLITICAL IMPLICATIONS OF VICTIMHOOD AND OTHER FORMS OF VULNERABILITY IN 21ST CENTURY BRITISH FICTION
Convenors:
Jean-Michel Ganteau, University of Montpellier 3, France, jean-michel.ganteau@univ-montp3.fr
Susana Onega, University of Zaragoza, Spain, sonega@unizar.es

Deconstructivist and trauma critics have popularised the view that trauma is unrepresentable. However, the proliferation of narratives representing traumatised or vulnerable individuals and groups shows that this is possible, even though through forms of rhetorical indirection such as symbolic language and narrative genres and modes of excess capable of providing an unfixed meaning to trauma. The seminar seeks contributions envisaging the role of 21st-century British novelists in the development of this new type of narrative to avoid the establishment of victimhood as an essentialist category of identity politics, and to provide strategies of resilience and foster the fruition of affects.

SLITE9 Saturday 30.8.2014 (A) 17.15–18.45/Sunday 31.8.2014 (B) 16.00–17.30

SEMINAR ON ENGLISH MANUSCRIPT STUDIES
Convenors:
Carlo Bajetta, Università della Valle d’Aosta, Italy, carlo.bajetta@univda.it
Guillaume Coatalen, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France, guillaumecoatalen@hotmail.com

The focus is on editing manuscripts from all periods, whether they be strictly literary or not. The seminar is particularly interested in unpublished material in manuscript. Research topics include, and are not restricted to, finding manuscripts and archival work, manuscript collections, scribal work, paleography, manuscripts as books, the coexistence of manuscripts and printed books, what manuscripts tell us on reading habits, editing manuscripts, electronic versus printed editions, manuscript studies and digital humanities. Manuscript studies have been on the cutting edge of literary theory and papers on authorship, the constitution of the text or hermeneutics are welcome.

SLITE10 CANCELLED

THE FORMS OF THE LANDSCAPE: SOUND/SENSE AND TOPOGRAPHY
Convenors:
Wolfgang Görtschacher, University of Salzburg, Austria, Wolfgang.Goertschacher@sbg.ac.at
David Malcolm, University of Gdańsk, Poland, david.malcolm@anglistyka.edu.pl

Landscape has formed a traditional subject of English-language poetry since the Renaissance. It has certainly been prominent in poetry from the last fifty years. A variety of poets have written powerfully of landscapes of the most varied kinds. These include: Ted Hughes, Basil Bunting, Seamus Heaney, Les Murray, Charles Tomlinson, Jon Silkin, Anne Stevenson, David Constantine, Michael Hofmann, Kathleen Jamie, Paula Meehan, and John Burnside. Landscape poetry is defined by its subject. However, in keeping with our two previous seminars at ESSE conferences (Turin 2010, Istanbul 2012), we are interested in how the subject of landscape relates to the technical or formal aspects of the poems that address the topic. How do rhythm and meter, phonological organisation, strophe, enjambment, and genre embody, question, undermine, or augment the landscape poem’s manifest content? We invite proposals that discuss the technical aspects of landscape poems and their meaning in English-language verse (for example, from North America, Britain, Ireland, Australia, South Africa, or India, although that of other national English-language traditions is also welcome) since 1960.

SLITE11 Saturday 30.8.2014 (A) 11.00–13.00, (B) 17.15–18.45

CONFORMISM AND ANTI-CONFORMISM RECONSIDERED: FROM POSTMODERNISM TO CONTEMPORARY SENSIBILITY IN BRITISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE AND ARTS
Convenors:
Jaroslav Kušnír, The University of Prešov, Slovakia, jkusnir@fhpv.unipo.sk
Dan Popescu, Partium Christian University, Romania, dhpopescu@yahoo.com

The most recent tendencies in British and American fiction show a certain wish to recuperate realistic meaning as well as to ironically point out the “exhaustion” of the poetics of the “former non-conformist” postmodern authors whose status has changed because of the “institutionalization” of their works. The position of the post-metafictional generation of authors – people such as David Foster Wallace, Villiam Vollmann, Mark Haddon, and others – manifests itself in an interest in reviving the position of the subject, in a certain distance from the earlier generation of postmodern authors and with it, in a new literary “non-conformism.” This session welcomes papers dealing with all aspects of those innovative kinds of poetics which are aimed at reconsidering or “creatively” extending postmodernist art. Comparative and interdisciplinary studies are encouraged.

SLITE12 Saturday 30.8.2014 17.15–18.45

THE RECEPTION OF VICTORIAN FICTION IN EUROPE
Convenors:
Ebbe Klitgård, Roskilde University, Denmark, ebbek@ruc.dk
Alberto Lázaro, Universidad de Alcalá, Spain, alberto.lazaro@uah.es

The publication of the volume The Reception of Charles Dickens in Europe this year has contributed to our understanding of the relationships between Victorian literature and the intellectual history of mainland Europe. However, much could be learned from looking at other significant writers of the same period. Papers are invited which investigate the ways in which British Victorian authors, such as George Eliot, William Thackeray, Thomas Hardy, Lewis Carroll, the Brontë sisters, Arthur Conan Doyle, Elizabeth Gaskell and many more have been translated, published, read and reviewed in Continental Europe over the last centuries.

SLITE13 Monday 1.9.2014 (A) 11.00–13.00, (B) 14.30–16.30

MAPPING THE PUBLIC AND THE PRIVATE IN THE NOVELS OF FEMALE DEVELOPMENT
Convenors:
Soňa Šnircová, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, sona.snircova@upjs.sk
Milena Kostić, University of Niš, Serbia, mkostic76@gmail.com

As some feminist theorists of the Bildungsroman claim, public and private spaces play crucially different roles in the male and female versions of the genre. While the classic works of the male Bildungsroman show that the hero’s development requires a move from the private space of home into the public sphere (formal education, independent life in the city), the heroines in the traditional novels of female development (such as Jane Eyre, Emma, The Mill on the Floss) are not allowed to make any significant move beyond the limits of domestic life. The seminar will explore whether the social and cultural changes brought by the second wave of feminism and the growing importance of the public sphere in the life of modern women have led to any significant changes in the representations of the public and the private in contemporary narratives of female Bildung.

SLITE14 Monday 1.9.2014 (A) 14.30–16.30, (B) 17.00–18.30

THE CHANGING FACETS OF PARATEXTS
Convenors:
Dorothee Birke, University of Freiburg, Germany, dorothee.birke@frias.uni-freiburg.de
Maxime Leroy, University of Haute-Alsace, France, maxime.leroy@uha.fr

This seminar welcomes papers on paratexts, particularly from the point of view of the developments in the relationships between authors–of all genres and periods–and their readers. Pertinent paratexts include titles, intertitles, prefaces, dedications, articles, interviews, illustrations, websites, blog posts, e-book author platforms, etc. Although papers may look at paratext in the context of one work or author, we strongly encourage those that will compare different text types, and/or paratexts from different periods or national traditions, in order to reveal continuities and discontinuities in topoi, modes of address, readers’ reception, and relations between text and paratext.

SLITE15 Saturday 30.8.2014 11.00–13.00

MODERN SCOTTISH DRAMA AND HISTORICAL MEMORY
Convenors:
Ian Brown, University of Kingston, UK, ijmbrown@hotmail.com
Daniele Berton-Charrière, Université Blaise Pascal, France, Daniele.BERTON@univ-bpclermont.fr

As Scotland’s September 2014 independence referendum approaches, an issue is “what constitutes Scotland?”, often called “an understated nation”. Plays, including McGrath’s The Cheviot, the Stag and the Black, Black Oil (1973), Lochhead’s Mary Queen of Scots got her head chopped off (1987) and Greig’s Dunsinane (2010), have addressed the constitution and mediation of Scottish historical memory and national/personal identities. This seminar addresses representation of historical memory in modern Scottish drama, whether as general theme, in individual playwrights’ oeuvre or in individual plays. Cross-generic papers contrasting issues of historical memory in the Scottish novel, poetry and/or song are also welcome.

SLITE16 Monday 1.9.2014 (A) 14.30–16.30, (B) 17.00–18.30

“THERE ARE BUT A HANDFUL OF STORIES IN THE WORLD”: J.M. COETZEE AND THE NON-ENGLISH LITERARY TRADITIONS
Convenors:
María J. López, University of Córdoba, Spain, ff2losam@uco.es
Kei Wiegandt, Freie Universität, Germany, kai.wiegandt@fu-berlin.de

This quote from J.M. Coetzee’s 2003 Nobel Lecture conveys the writer’s need to borrow stories from others; the fact that “if the young are to be forbidden to prey upon the old, then they must sit forever in silence”. Whereas research on Coetzee has concentrated on Coetzee’s English intertexts, we welcome papers that focus on the dialogue that Coetzee’s fictional and non-fictional works establish with literary traditions other than those of the English language. Accepted papers will be considered for publication after the conference.

SLITE17 Saturday 30.8.2014 17.15–18.45

WALTER SCOTT AND THE SHAPING OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY NOVEL
Convenors:
Ian Brown, Kingston University, London, UK, ijmbrown@hotmail.com
David Clark, Universidade da Coruña, Spain, dclark@udc.es

2014 marks the 200th anniversary of the publication of Walter Scott's Waverley, a sensation on its appearance. Scott's subsequent career as a novelist shaped the nature of the novel and his influence, often now deeply embedded and equally often neglected, has been fundamental to the establishment of the modern novel as a genre, not only in Europe but also in the rest of the world. This seminar invites papers not only on Scott's novels but on the development of the nineteenth-century novel in English, particularly with regard to the influence of – or reaction against – Scott's pioneering example.

SLITE18 Sunday 31.8.2014 11.00–13.00

EDWIN MORGAN AND THE PROSPECT OF SCOTLAND
Convenors:
Alan Riach, University of Glasgow, UK, Alan.Riach@glasgow.ac.uk
Silke Stroh, University of Muenster, Germany, Silke.Stroh@uni-muenster.de

In Sonnets from Scotland (1984), Edwin Morgan envisioned a national history and potential which has increasingly urgent political application as the referendum on independence approaches in 2014. His poem on the Scottish parliament (2004) stressed connections between literary, cultural and political vitality. This seminar considers the place of poetry in national self-imagining, national self-realisation and continuing critical awareness. We welcome papers examining Morgan's work in the national context, his relation with his poetic precedent Hugh MacDiarmid, his legacy to contemporary writers, and international connections through his translations from European literatures and through North and South American concrete and postmodern influences.

SLITE19 CANCELLED

LIZ LOCHHEAD AND THE SIGNIFICANCE OF JOURNEY
Convenors:
M. Jean Berton, Universite de Toulouse II, France, jam.berton@wanadoo.fr
Anne Varty, University of London, UK, a.varty@rhul.ac.uk

In 2012 Liz Lochhead published “My Favourite Place” in which she describes her journey from Glasgow to Loch Uig. Conveying an enriched sense of place, the poem is also a journey into memory, into love, into mourning, and it stretches the idea of home. In a period when Scotland reconfigures its political and cultural identity, this seminar opens consideration of the figure of the journey in Lochhead’s work, both her theatre and her poetry. It invites papers on this theme in its broadest sense, to include geographical travel, identity and the sense of place, transgression, trespass, memory, linguistic difference, political union and fragmentation, perspectives of distance or proximity.

SLITE20 Monday 1.9.2014 (A) 14.30–16.30, (B) 17.00–18.30

THE UNEXPECTED IN JOSEPH CONRAD’S FICTION
Convenors:
Josiane Paccaud-Huguet, Université Lumière-Lyon 2, France, paccaud.josiane@orange.fr
Claude Maisonnat, Université Lumière-Lyon 2, France, Claude.maisonnat@univ-lyon2.fr
Wieslaw Krajka, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Poland,
wieslaw.krajka@poczta.umcs.lublin.pl

“It is always the unexpected that happens,“ Marlow muses in Lord Jim. In Conrad’s texts, the unexpected is at least disruptive, often traumatic. A trivial object, an insignificant event or character crops up, and the course of reality is undone. The symbolic order is shaken at its roots, the truth is glimpsed. One occurrence of the unexpected won’t make the protagonist wiser, however, there is no ready-made answer. How does Conrad’s fiction deal with the contingent, the traumatic? If we follow Giorgio Agamben’s argument that the contemporary writer always takes us by surprise, how does Conrad remain our contemporary in this respect?

SLITE 21 Sunday 31.8.2014 16.00–17.30

CANADIAN LITERATURE IN A MULTI-CENTRIC WORLD
Convenors:
Michelle Gadpaille, University of Maribor, Slovenia, michelle.gadpaille@uni-mb.si,
Vesna Lopicic, University of Nis, Serbia, lovevuk@gmail.com

Theorist Slavoj Žižek has claimed that we inhabit a “multicentric world.” What does this mean for contemporary English Canadian literature? The panel invites papers on Canadian literary multiculturalism in the context of the de-centering of cultural production and the eclipse of conventional gatekeepers of cultural prestige. Potential topics are as follows:
Literary prizes and power redistribution
Multiculturalism and the dissolution of literary Canadian-ness
Electronics and de-centered literary production
Becoming Canadians: The educational and cultural profile of the new second generation of immigrants

SLITE 22 Sunday 31.8.2014 11.00–13.00

INTERDISCIPLINARY DICKENS
Convenors:
Dominic Rainsford, University of Aarhus, Denmark, dominic.rainsford@hum.au.dk
Soňa Šnircová, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, sona.snircova@upjs.sk

Thanks to the recent growth in attention to Dickens’s non-fictional writings, as well as to increasingly sophisticated readings of his fiction, we are beginning to appreciate that he was keenly aware of many of the intellectual currents of his time. This seminar will explore this inter-connectedness further. We invite papers that show Dickens’s interest in philosophy, economics, psychology, historiography, ethnography, the natural sciences, technology, medicine or any other field of empirical or theoretical research.

Linguistics

SLANG1 Sunday 31.8.2014 (A) 11.00–13.00, (B) 16.00–17.30

PRODUCTIVITY IN WORD-FORMATION
Convenors:
Mark Aronoff, Stony Brook University in New York, U.S.A., mark.aronoff@stonybrook.edu
Pavol Stekauer, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, pavel.stekauer@upjs.sk

Extensive research on morphological productivity in the last decades has not only led to new ideas and theories but also indicated a range of problems. The seminar will concentrate on the following topics:
Methods of computing productivity
Form-based vs. cognitively founded approaches to productivity
Productivity as competition between word-formation processes/rules
Discrete vs. scalar notions of productivity
Constraints on productivity
Actual, potential, possible, and probable words
Sociolinguistic factors influencing the productivity of word-formation

SLANG2 Monday 1.9.2014 (A)14.30–16.30, (B)17.00–18.30

SEMANTICS OF EVALUATIVE MORPHOLOGY
Convenors:
Alexandra Bagasheva, Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski, Bulgaria, abagasheva@gmail.com
Lívia Körtvélyessy, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, livia.kortvelyessy@upjs.sk

During the last 30 years the concept of evaluative morphology (EM) has been discussed from various perspectives and in various languages. While most of these discussions were focused on formal aspects of EM the aim of the seminar is:
to discuss the possibilities of a universal semantic model of EM, including various approaches to the semantics of EM, the range of cognitive categories covered by EM as well as their possible realizations;
to discuss the semantics of EM in individual languages that might support but also contradict any of the suggested universal models.

SLANG3 Tuesday 2.9.2014 11.00–13.00

WORD-FORMATION AND TRANSPARENCY IN MEDICAL ENGLISH
Convenors:
Pius ten Hacken, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck, Austria,
pius.ten-hacken@uibk.ac.at
Renáta Panocová, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, renata.panocova@upjs.sk

As a side effect of the rapid progress in medical research and of the emergence of new medical conditions, medicine is a domain where new concepts have to be named more frequently than in many other domains. Because of the prominent position of English in medical research, most of these concepts are first named in English. This seminar will consider naming strategies used for these concepts from the perspectives of how transparent the resulting names are for practitioners and the general public and how they create problems for translation into other languages.

SLANG4 Saturday 30.8.2014 (A) 11.00–13.00, (B) 17.15–18.45

WORD-FORMATION IN CONTRASTIVE ANALYSIS
Convenors:
Vladimir Ž. Jovanović, University of Niš, Serbia, vladimir.jovanovic@filfak.ni.ac.rs
Jovanka Lazarevska-Stančevska, University Ss Cyril and Methodius in Skopje, Macedonia,
jovanka@ukim.edu.mk

The seminar will present a framework for discussions about various issues of interest to the linguistic domain of word-formation in view of the contrastive linguistic method and its main tenets. The focus of the seminar is to gather contributions by professionals that have been studying the processes conducive to the formation of lexis by comparing and contrasting at least two different languages, English necessarily being one of them. The objective is to juxtapose not only the products of the processes such as affixation, compounding and any of the secondary mechanisms, but also to address the similarities and differences underlying the productive patterns, the ways English formative models may affect the processes of other languages, to the end of reaching generalizations about English word-formation, as well as that of other languages.

SLANG5 Sunday 31.8.2014 (A) 16.00–17.30/Monday 1.9.2014 (B) 11.00–13.00

COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF ENGLISH IDIOMS
Convenors:
Lilli Tissen, Albrechts Universität, Germany, l.tissen@mail.de
Tatiana Fedulenkova, Vladimir State University, Russia, fedulenkova@list.ru
Natalia Potselueva, Pavlodar State University, Russia, nata_potz@inbox.ru

The topic of common and specific features in idioms of different languages as compared to English idioms will be discussed, including:
common and specific features in the structure of idioms compared: in the lexical and functional character of their components, in the grammatical composition of the idioms (e.g. Verb + Adj + Noun), in the dependence of components within idioms,
common and specific features in the meanings of the idioms compared, in mechanisms of semantic transformation of their prototype: metaphor, metonymy, synecdoche, hyperbole,
common and specific features in the origin of idioms compared, in their functional and pragmatic values.

SLANG6 Saturday 30.8.2014 (A)17.15–18.45/Sunday 31.8.2014 (B) 11.00–13.00

PHRASEOLOGY AND BUSINESS TERMINOLOGY: THE POINTS OF CROSSING
Convenors:
Tatiana Fedulenkova, Vladimir State University, Russia, fedulenkova@list.ru
Yakiv Bystrov, Precarpathian National University in Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine, ybystrov@ukr.net

We often come across such phraseological units (PUs) as “Occam's razor”, “nest egg”, “sleeping beauty”, “small dragons” which appear to function as units of business terminology. Papers on business terminology of idiomatic character are welcome to the Seminar. Items for discussion:
structural, semantic and contextual approaches to business PU-terms;
types, classifications, and LSP applications of terms of idiomatic character;
metaphor and metonomy as basic mechanisms of meaning transformation of the PU prototypical word combination;
characteristics of dictionary entries and definitions of PU-terms and their pragmatic value;
traditions and innovations in teaching business phraseology at universities.

SLANG7 CANCELLED

SEMANTIC PROSODY ACROSS BORDERS
Convenors:
Lachlan Mackenzie, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands, lachlan_mackenzie@hotmail.com
Hortensia Pârlog, University of the West, Timişoara, Romania, abaparlog@gmail.com

Semantic prosody, highlighted by John M. Sinclair and others, refers to certain words’ preference for collocates with either positive or negative associations. The apparently neutral verb cause, for example, has been shown to “prefer” negatively loaded objects (problems, death, damage, etc.). Semantic prosody is hardly ever recorded in dictionaries and therefore remains opaque to translators and learners. We invite papers that compare semantic prosody in English and at least one other language. We also welcome papers which discuss the theoretical status of semantic prosody and/or address the challenges faced by work in this area.

SLANG8 Monday 1.9.2014 (A) 14.30–16.30, (B) 17.00–18.30/Tuesday 2.9.2014 ( C )11.00–13.00

CROSS-LINGUISTIC AND CROSS-CULTURAL APPROACHES TO PHRASEOLOGY
Convenors:
Tatiana Fedulenkova, Vladimirsky State University, fedulenkova@list.ru
Victoria Ivashchenko, Institute of the Ukranian Language, Kiev, Ukraine, vicivashchenko@ukr.net

The seminar will focus on new theoretical perspectives and the latest developments in phraseology, including stylistic investigations, the issues of tradition vs creativity in the use of phraseological units in discourse, and cross-linguistic and cross-cultural research. The pedagogical implications of teaching the stylistic use of phraseologisms also present great interest, both to native and L2 students. Participants are encouraged to present their observations and theoretical conclusions on the basis of systematic studies of empirical material. Discussions of paradigmatic relations of English phraseologisms (synonymical, antonymical, hypero-hyponymical, etc.) in the system of the language, as well as a cross-linguistic approach, are welcome.

SLANG9 Saturday 30.8.2014 (A)17.15–18.45/Sunday 31.8.2014 (B)11.00–13.00, ( C ) 16.00–17.30

INFORMATION STRUCTURE OF DISCOURSE
Convenors:
Libuše Dušková, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic, libuse.duskova@ff.cuni.cz
Jana Chamonikolasová, Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic, chamonikolasova@phil.muni.cz
Renáta Gregová, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, renata.gregova@upjs.sk

The seminar presents different approaches to and different applications of the theory of information structure. The focus is on the multifarious aspects of information structure stemming from its close relationship to other linguistic disciplines. The topics of papers cover the dynamics of discourse especially from the viewpoints of the structure and character of context, the theme-rheme / topic-focus structure of sentences, the structure of larger textual units, paragraphs and whole texts, and the role of intonation in spoken discourse. The analyses are based on the material of written and spoken texts, as well as on parallel bi-lingual or multi-lingual materials.

SLANG10 Saturday 30.8.2014 (A) 11.00–13.00, (B) 17.15–18.45

INVESTIGATING ACADEMIC DISCOURSES: ENGLISH LANGUAGE USE AT EUROPEAN UNIVERSITIES
Convenors:
Vander Viana, University of Stirling, UK, vander.viana@stir.ac.uk
Aisling O’Boyle, Queen’s University Belfast, UK, a.oboyle@qub.ac.uk

Academic discourses have become a focal point for both language researchers and teachers. With universities aiming to expand their international reach, it is vital to examine how English is used in various academic contexts. This seminar explores the notion of academic discourses, investigating English language use in diverse spoken/written genres and registers, subject areas, and national varieties. In the long run, the results of such empirical investigations will not only provide a detailed understanding of the ways of being and doing in contemporary academia, but they should also be pedagogically useful in the design of modules on English for academic purposes.

SLANG11 Monday 1.9.2014 (A) 11.00–13.00, (B) 14.30–16.30

CONTRASTIVE ANALYSIS OF DISCOURSE-PRAGMATIC ASPECTS OF LINGUISTIC GENRES
Convenors:
Karin Aijmer, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, karin.aijmer@eng.gu.se
Diana Lewis, Aix-Marseille Université, France, diana.lewis@univ-amu.fr

The seminar explores the comparability of discourse-pragmatic characteristics of genres across European languages, using parallel corpora (aligned translated texts) and/or comparable corpora (genre-matched original texts). Genres, defined by sociolinguistic contextual parameters, often show distinctive patterns of frequency and distribution of linguistic features in relation to other genres or to the wider language. The seminar compares such patterns across English and (an)other language(s), in areas such as modality, pragmatic markers, speech acts, rhetorical structure. It deals with spoken, written or multimodal genres within domains such as political discourse, public communication, journalism, academic and professional discourse, addressing both methodological and theoretical issues.

SLANG12 Saturday 30.8.2014, 11.00–13.00

REPRESENTATIONS OF (NEW) EUROPEANS IN PRIVATE, MEDIATED AND PUBLIC DISCOURSES
Convenors:
Jan Chovanec, Masaryk University, Czech Republic, chovanec@phil.muni.cz
Katarzyna Molek-Kozakowska, Opole University, Poland, molekk@uni.opole.pl

The seminar aims to address the discursive construction of Europe’s citizens and nations, with a particular focus on the countries that recently joined the EU. We wish to explore, among others, the discursive strategies in which the opposing groups of “us” v. “them” – (e.g. old/new, 17/27, North/South) – are formulated, with their underlying ideologies and resulting projected identities. We welcome case studies as well as comparative (e.g. cross-cultural or diachronic) analyses based on material from diverse sources (e.g. media, political speeches, policy papers) that preferably approach the issue from the perspective of (critical) discourse analysis and pragmatics.

SLANG13 CANCELLED

LATE MODERN LOWER-ORDER LETTERS: MIRRORS OF LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL CHANGE
Convenors:
Matylda Włodarczyk, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland, wmatylda@ifa.amu.edu.pl
Mikko Laitinen, Linnaeus Universtity, Sweden, mikko.laitinen@lnu.se
Anita Auer, Utrecht University, The Netherlands, A.Auer@uu.nl

Letter-writing is a linguistic activity which reflects sociocultural processes. In particular, epistolary evidence from the Late Modern period opens insights into the changing lives of the middling and lower orders in the era of industrialisation, urbanisation, increased mobility and even democratisation. Yet, linguistic publications popularising lower-order letters are scarce, while projects aiming to render the data in a searchable digital format have so far only been teething. This seminar seeks to draw the attention of researchers in language, history, society and culture to the need for studying archival letter collections not only of a specialist, but also of broader interdisciplinary interest and value. Contributions are welcome from scholars working in the field of discourse and language, and we particularly welcome approaches attesting the social circumstances and contacts as well as professional and family histories of the lower social classes in Late Modern Britain and the colonies.

SLANG14 Saturday 30.8.2014 (A) 11.00–13.00, (B) 17.15–18.45, Sunday 31.8.2014 ( C ) 11.00–13.00

CHANGING DISCOURSES, CHANGING WORKPLACES: POSTMODERN TRENDS IN INSTITUTIONAL COMMUNICATION
Convenors:

Cornelia Ilie, Zayed University, United Arab Emirates, cornelia.ilie@gmail.com
Giuliana Garzone, University of Milan, Italy, giuliana.garzone@unimi.it

In increasingly multicultural and interconnected work environments, members of communities of practice start by applying existing discourse-reinforced conventions, while gradually adjusting and changing them, which leads to a hybridisation of discourse structures and strategies across workplaces and cultures. The seminar aims to explore effects of the interplay between discourse styles and workplace practices enacted in culture-specific and multicultural institutional or organisational contexts (e.g. business, education, media, politics). A special emphasis will be on metadiscourse and intertextuality in professional discourses, face-to-face and online negotiation of identities, culture-based and cross-cultural attitudes to leadership roles, and stereotypes related to race, gender and class.

SLANG15 Monday 1.9.2014 11.00–13.00

CORPORA OF ACADEMIC SPOKEN ENGLISH – ISSUES IN COMPILATION, TRANSCRIPTION AND USE
Convenors:
Stefan Diemer, Saarland University, Germany, s.diemer@mx.uni-saarland.de
Maria Georgieva, St. Kliment Ohridski University, Bulgaria, maria.mageorg@gmail.com

The ever growing spread of English as the language of communication in international academic settings has uncovered the need to further extend and diversify the range of speech samples in terms of language and cultural background of the interlocutors. We invite speakers who want to discuss or offer solutions to problems of building Spoken English corpora. Some issues of interest are: recording, combining and standardizing audio and video, tagging structural and communication features, transcribing non-standard language use, conversation planning and background data, technical aspects of using video-/audio-recording programmes for corpus compilation, transcription systems, storage and availability of large spoken corpora.

SLANG16 Saturday 30.8.2014 (A) 11.00–13.00, (B) 17.15–18.45

LEXICAL BUNDLES IN ENGLISH NON-FICTION WRITING: FORMS AND FUNCTIONS
Convenors:
Jukka Tyrkkö, University of Tampere, Finland, jukka.tyrkko@uta.fi
Joanna Kopaczyk, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland, jkopaczyk@wa.amu.edu.pl

One of the key benefits of corpus linguistic methods is that they give us access to otherwise hard-to-discern lexical, phraseological and grammatical patterns. Lexical bundles, or n-grams, can signify fixed practices of language use. In diachronic study of language such patterns are often related to linguistic processes of change such as grammaticalization and semantic entrenchment, and they also testify to the operation of Sinclair's idiom principle. Contributions to this seminar will discuss these fixed repetitive sequences in non-fiction writing, with particular reference to text-type-specific aspects of formulaicity, complexity and (non-)creativity in written English. The papers will be published in a peer-reviewed edited volume.

SLANG17 Tuesday 2.9.2014 11.00–13.00

CORPUS PRAGMA-STYLISTICS
Convenors:
Ursula Lutzky, Birmingham City University, UK, ursula.lutzky@bcu.ac.uk
Carla Suhr, University of Turku, Finland, carla.suhr@utu.fi

This interdisciplinary seminar focuses on the rising field of corpus pragma-stylistics. Its aim is therefore to demonstrate how the study of language in use and the study of language in (literary) texts can be combined in order to arrive at innovative results. Additionally, this seminar seeks to attract papers using a corpus linguistic methodology to this end; that is to say, they will exploit tools and resources developed in the field of corpus linguistics to gain insights into a specific (collection of) text(s). The seminar welcomes both synchronic and diachronic studies from all periods of the English language.

SLANG18 Saturday 30.8.2014 17.15–18.45

CORPUS INTEROPERABILITY AND SPOKEN DIACHRONIC DATABASES : THE NECTE-DECTE CORPORA
Convenors:
Nicolas Ballier, Université Paris Diderot, France, nicolas.ballier@univ-paris-diderot.fr
Karen Corrigan, University of Newcastle, UK, karen.corrigan@btinternet.com
Hermann Moisl, University of Newcastle, UK, hermann.moisl@newcastle.ac.uk

The seminar welcomes papers dealing with sociolinguistic surveys of Geordie encapsulated in the NECTE and DECTE corpora. In the wake of Beal, Corrigan and Moisl 2007 selection of papers, the two corpora will be discussed by linguists investigating syntactic, prosodic and phonetic features, questioning the connections between linguistic data, corpus annotation, linguistic research questions and technological queries.

SLANG19 Monday 1.9.2014 17.00–18.30

DIACHRONIC CORPUS STUDIES OF ENGLISH
Convenors:
Jan Čermák, Charles University Prague, Czech Republic, Jan.Cermak@ff.cuni.cz
Rafał Molencki, Uniwersytet Śląski w Katowicach, Poland, molencki@poczta.onet.pl

Digitalization of historical corpora of English has significantly affected the diachronic studies since the early 1990s. Earlier studies were based on the relatively short text samples of the Helsinki Corpus, but now the complete Old English corpus, numerous Middle English and Early Modern English texts, as well as major historical dictionaries are available as huge searchable databases. More and more libraries offer digital versions of complete medieval manuscripts enabling scholars to verify the (mis)interpretations of earlier editors. These technological advancements have made the work of a historical linguist easier in terms of speed and text accessibility, but have also created some new problems.

SLANG20 Tuesday 2.9.2014 11.00–13.00

PRAGMATIC VALUES IN NON-DIALOGIC TEXTS: A DIACHRONIC PERSPECTIVE
Convenors:
Gabriella Mazzon, University of Innsbruck, Austria, Gabriella.Mazzon@uibk.ac.at
Minna Nevala, University of Helsinki, Finland, aunio@mappi.helsinki.fi

The seminar aims at discussing ways in which texts from various times, belonging to genres that are not explicitly dialogic or fictional, encoded pragmatic meanings to construct their readers as interlocutors, and to pursue their communicative goals. Correspondence, early newspapers, instructional texts, religious and political prose, had different strategies to establish relationships with their addressees, and to perform their role as “macro-speech acts”. These strategies changed over time in connection with changes in language, in society and in specific textual communities, and can be traced (synchronically or diachronically) through indicators such as personal pronouns, modal markers, pragmatic markers and others.

SLANG21 Sunday 31.8.2014 16.00–17.30

GRAMMATICALIZATION, LEXICALIZATION, CONSTRUCTIONALIZATION
Convenors:
Jan Čermák, Charles University Prague, Czech Republic, Jan.Cermak@ff.cuni.cz
Rafał Molencki, Uniwersytet Śląski w Katowicach, Poland, molencki@poczta.onet.pl

The idea of grammaticalization was introduced to linguistics by Meillet (1912), who defined it as the attribution of grammatical character to a formerly independent word. In modern times the term is used to refer to the wider phenomenon when a new linguistic form simply becomes fixed or obligatory. Lexicalization takes place when a complex phrase comes to make a new lexical unit. In the early 21st century a new concept of constructionalization appeared, described as a process of conventionalization of the whole new construction (Traugott & Trousdale 2010). All these related terms are used in recent diachronic studies of languages, including English.

SLANG22 Sunday 31.8.2014 (A)11.00–13.00, (B) 16.00–17.30

WRITING IN NON-STANDARD ENGLISH
Convenors:
Isabelle Roblin, Université du Littoral Côte d'Opale, Isabelle.Roblin@univ-littoral.fr
Linda Pillière, Aix Marseille Université, France, linda.pilliere@univ-amu.fr
Jane Hodson, University of Sheffield, UK, j.hodson@sheffield.ac.uk

In recent years, the once firmly held opinion that English is a homogeneous language has been called into question by linguists and literary scholars alike. This seminar will bring together researchers in literature, stylistics and linguistics to share and compare methodologies for analyzing the representation of non-standard English in literature from the nineteenth century to the present day. Topics will include the role of non-standard English in literary texts, reader-response to non-standard English in literary texts, the ideological implications of representing non-standard English, the diverse literary and linguistic strategies used by writers to represent non-standard varieties, and the relevance of linguistic verisimilitude when analyzing literary dialects.

SLANG23 CANCELLED

NEWS TRANSLATION: JOURNALISM OR TRANSLATION?
Convenors:
Roberto A. Valdeón, Universidad de Oviedo, Spain, valdeon@uniovi.es
Krisztina Károly, Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary, karoly.krisztina@btk.elte.hu

Translating news as discourse has been in the focus of attention over the last 30 years. Major news agencies publish in English, news media are associated to share information and, often, many have versions in different languages, English being the central one. The characteristics of translating news are studied from several angles, focusing on language-pair-specific considerations, the special role(s) of the news translator, particular components of the discourse structure of news stories and various, suprasentential aspects of news texts. Focusing on these approaches, the seminar explores the extent to which the discourse production characterizing news translation approximates that of journalism or translation.

SLANG24 Monday 1.9.2014 (A)11.00–13.00, (B)14.30–16.30

THE PRAGMATICS OF BORROWING: ASSESSING THE PRAGMATIC EFFECTS OF BORROWINGS FROM AND INTO ENGLISH
Convenors:
Gisle Andersen, Norwegian School of Economics, Norway, gisle.andersen@nhh.no
Cristiano Furiassi, Università degli Studi di Torino, Italy, cristiano.furiassi@unito.it
Biljana Mišić Ilić, Univerisity of Nis, Serbia, bmisicilic@gmail.com

Existing research on the influence exerted by English on other languages has predominantly been concerned with lexical aspects. Less attention has been paid to pragmatic aspects, e.g. socio-cultural prerequisites, the covert prestige attributed to the donor culture and factors affecting the transition from code-mixing to established borrowing. Against the backdrop of recent studies, this seminar focuses on pragmatic borrowing, which concerns both the incorporation of discoursal features from English into other languages, as well as contextual/socio-cultural motivations for the proliferation of English-based borrowings. Contributions on specific languages are welcome. The seminar is also open to studies looking at pragmatic borrowing into English.

SLANG25 Sunday 31.8.2014 16.00–17.30

IMPOLITENESS ACROSS LANGUAGES AND CULTURES
Convenors:
Małgorzata Szymańska, University of Wrocław, Poland, malgorzata.szymanska@uni.wroc.pl
Charles Bonnot, Université Paris-Diderot, France, charles.bonnot@yahoo.fr

The seminar will concentrate on issues related to linguistic impoliteness in various languages, contexts and cultures. The focus will be on pragmatic aspects of impolite or face aggravating linguistic behaviour. We will welcome contributions within pragmatic but also discursive, cognitive, and blended approaches to the study of anti-social language behaviour. Both theoretical and empirical papers are welcome.

SLANG26 Monday 1.9.2014 (A)14.30–16.30, (B)17.00–18.30

EUROPEAN VARIATIONS IN ESP ACROSS THEORY AND PRACTICE
Convenors:
Shaeda Isani, Grenoble University, France, shaeda.isani@u-grenoble3.fr
Alessandra Molino, University of Turin, Italy, alessandra.molino@unito.it
Michel van der Yeught, Aix-Marseille University, France, michel.vanderyeught@univ-amu.fr
Annalisa Zanola, University of Brescia, Italy, zanola@eco.unibs.it

As ESP research and teaching programmes multiply and evolve the world over, there is increasing diversity amongst researchers regarding the objectives and finality of the discipline and ways and means of achieving them. This seminar invites ESP scholars and practitioners to reflect on this diversity at national, European and global levels to identify differences and similarities and pave the way for greater exchange and collaboration amongst European ESP specialists. Proposals will focus on such key ESP issues as needs analysis, specialized languages as objects of scientific enquiry, synchronic vs. diachronic approaches, specialized domains and communities, specialized discourse, cultures and genres and interdisciplinary approaches.

SLANG27 Sunday 31.8.2014 16.00–17.30

ENGLISH IN EUROPEAN LINGUISTIC LANDSCAPES
Convenors:
Milan Ferenčík, University of Prešov, Slovakia, milan.ferencik@unipo.sk
Judit Szabóné Papp, University of Miskolc, Hungary, nyejudit@uni-miskolc.hu

The seminar is intended to provide a forum for the discussion of the placements, functions and manifestations of English in the linguistic landscapes (LL) of the ´expanding-circle´ of European countries. It welcomes data-driven contributions by practitioners of different social-scientific research creeds, esp. sociolinguists, pragmalinguists and applied linguists, who have welcomed the emergence of the transdisciplinary approaches of ´linguistic landscape´ and ´geosemiotics´ and who have employed their methodologies in order to get to grips with the conspicuous presence of English language in the visual richness of contemporary urban landscapes.

SLANG28 Monday 1.9.2014 (A) 17.00–18.30

NON-WORDS, NONCE-WORDS AND MORPHOLOGY TEACHING
Convenors:
Silvia Cacchiani, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, silvia.cacchiani@unimore.it
Christoph Haase, Purkinye University, Czech Republic, christoph.haase@ujep.cz

While psycho- and neurolinguistics (e.g. Marslen-Wilson 2007, Rastle etal. 2008, Crepaldi 2010) have shown increasing interest in the representation of non-words, nonce-words or nonsensical words in the mental lexicon, their potential as a yardstick for the morphological competence of L2 learners has not been widely explored. The aim of this seminar is to bring together theoretical and applied research on non-words, nonce-words, and the teaching of English morphology. Suggested topics include (but are not restricted to): analogy in morphology and L2 learning; best practice in morphology teaching; learner access to lexical strata, feature percolation and permissibility, and related performance.

SLANG29 Monday 1.9.2014 11.00–13.00

LEXICAL ISSUES IN L2 WRITING
Convenors:
Päivi Pietilä, University of Turku, Finland, paipi@utu.fi
Katalin Doró, University of Szeged, Hungary, dorokati@lit.u-szeged.hu
Renata Pipalová, Charles University, Czech Republic, m.pipal@volny.cz

This seminar addresses vital lexical issues in L2 writing from learning, teaching and research perspectives. The papers presented may attempt to answer the following questions, for example: How are accuracy, fluency and complexity intertwined in written texts? What lexical and other devices are used to achieve cohesion and coherence in texts written in L2 English? What kinds of lexical strategies do learners (at different proficiency levels) use in L2 writing? How is vocabulary use affected by factors such as text type, timing/lack of timing, topic, L1, individual learner differences, etc? What are the challenges of L2 academic writing and assessment?

SLANG30 CANCELLED

TEACHER’S PRESENCE IN CLASS. A JOB OR A PERFORMANCE?
Convenors:
Anatol Shevel, University of Rzeszow, Poland, ashevel@univ.rzeszow.pl
Nadja Mifka-Profozic, University of Zadar, Croatia, nmifkap@unizd.hr

The core of EFL teacher training can be formulated as ”Different people can do the same job, but depending on how they do it the final effect will be different”. The purpose of the seminar is to concentrate on “Teacher as a Performer” and bring to the fore a discussion on the following aspects: Appearance (dress code & sense); Voice management; Movement (appropriateness & proximity); Language (rough-tuning); Body language (gestures & mimics); Calligraphy; Sense of humour; Personality type; Life experience; Professional knowledge & skills (techniques). The speakers are invited to make a projection of the techniques used in coaching and management motivation onto EFL teaching. The research can vary within socio-cultural, psychological, linguistic studies.

SLANG31 CANCELLED

SUMMATIVE VS FORMATIVE FEEDBACK AND THE CREATION OF SCHOLARLY IDENTITY
Convenors:
Jane Mattisson Ekstam, Kristianstad University, Sweden, jane.mattisson@hkr.se
Claudia Doroholschi, West University Timişoara, Romania, claudia.doroholschi@litere.uvt.ro

In our seminar we shall discuss the functions and forms of teacher written feedback. Studies have demonstrated that while peer reviewing is an important part of the writing process for students, it is teacher feedback that is most highly appreciated (Ken and Fiona Hyland, 2006). We shall situate teacher written feedback in the context of the wider institutional, social and cultural factors which have been found to influence how feedback is given and received. We shall also discuss the „how“ and „what“ of feedback – the ways it is shaped through its modes of delivery and form. The aim of all writing must be to create a distinct scholarly identity. The basis for our discussions is thus the all-important question „To what extent has summative feedback, designed to evaluate writing as a product, generally been replaced by formative feedback that points forward to the student's future writing and the development of his or her writing processes?“

SLANG32 Saturday 30.8.2014 (A)11.00–13.00, (B)17.15–18.45

ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS – EXCEPTIONAL ENGLISH FOR EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS?
Convenors:
Ewa Domagala-Zysk, John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland, ewadom@kul.pl
Edit Hegybiro Kontra, Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary, ehkontra@gmail.com

The seminar addresses educators and linguists involved in the recent upsurge of European action research focusing on learners with special educational needs. For many years in the past D/deaf, blind, intellectually challenged or dyslexic students were excluded from learning foreign languages, but contemporary educational and social trends such as normalization, integration or inclusion have changed this situation. The purpose of the seminar is thus to share experiences and bring to the fore a discussion on the following points: 1). Conceptual representations for words in English in individuals with sensory or cognitive challenges; 2. Teaching strategies and class techniques to enhance both motivation and language performance; 3. The role of oral communication and sign languages in EFL classes for the D/deaf; 4). Cooperative practices in primary, secondary and tertiary foreign language education for students with disabilities.

Culture

SCULT1 Monday 1.9.2014 11.00–13.00

WOMEN’S LIVES, WOMEN’S WORKS, A TALE OF MUTUAL INFLUENCES
Convenors:
Florence Binard, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, France, fbinard@eila.univ-paris-diderot.fr
Julie Gottlieb, University of Sheffield, UK, julie.gottlieb@sheffield.ac.uk
Michel Prum, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, France, prum.michel@wanadoo.fr

This seminar will aim to study the impact of women’s personal lives and experiences on their theoretical, fictional or artistic productions. Conversely the influence of women’s productions on their own lives will be explored. These mutual influences will be addressed from the perspective of the history of ideas. The geographical area will be Britain but women living and working in other areas, whether European or not, also fall into the province of this workshop provided that their biographies or autobiographies are in some way related to Britain. No historical period will be excluded. The reference to “women’s works” includes all kinds of intellectual activities: fiction, drama, poetry, philosophy, journalism, cinema, painting, sciences, etc.

SCULT2 Monday 1.9.2014 (A)11.00–13.00, (B)14.30–16.30

EUROPE FOOD INC.: EATING AND COOKING IN THE ARTS
Convenors:
Nieves Pascual, University of Jaen, Spain, npascual@ujaen.es
Silvia Baučeková, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, silvia.baucekova@gmail.com

Over the last few decades, a number of studies have explored food as a central identity trope by focusing on artistic movements, historical periods, particular genres and ethnic groups within the United States. All of them reveal the theoretical fruitfulness that culinary-based analyses provide. In a European context, such research has been scarce. We welcome contributions that address the ways in which eating and cooking define and represent present-day Europe. Various types of texts may be considered, including literary works, works of cultural theory, newspaper articles, magazines, travel guides, webpages, media programs, films and visual arts in general.

SCULT3 Tuesday 2.9.2014 11.00–13.00

GENDER ACROSS THE MEDIA: 21ST-CENTURY MASCULINITIES IN FILM AND TV FICTION
Convenors:
Marta Fernández, University of the Balearic Islands, Spain, marta.fernandez@uib.es
Martina Martausová, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, martina.martausova@upjs.sk

After a period of agreement over a crisis in masculinity, the new century and its mediatized inauguration – 9/11 – seem to have reopened the debate about male identities. The fragmented status of feminism, the transnational crisis and the culture of fear after the 2001 bombings may have lit the revival of the John Wayne myth, as Faludi argues in The Terror Dream. This seminar explores 21st-century representation(s) and reception(s) of male figures in film and television fiction, continuing the discussion forwarded by Faludi and writers like Peggy Noonan, who in 2001 affirmed: “from the ashes of 9/11 arise the manly virtues”.

SCULT4 Monday 1.9.2014 (A)17.00–18.30/Tuesday 2.9.2014 (B)11.00–13.00

GENDER AND POPULAR CULTURE
Convenors:
Astrid M. Fellner, Saarland University, Germany, fellner@mx.uni-saarland.de
Viera Nováková, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, viera.novakova@upjs.sk

This seminar intends to explore cultural makings of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality through typical representations of gender within popular culture. Papers are invited on the topic of gender and popular culture, including historical frameworks and methodology of relevant disciplines in relation to the study of gender and culture. Looking into the ways in which gendered and sexual identities are shaped by, and in turn shape, popular understandings of gender, papers may also address the ways in which sex, gender, and sexuality are interrelated with critical factors such as ethnicity, class, age, and region.

SCULT5 Saturday 30.8.2014 17.15–18.45

ANGLICIST WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES OF CONTINENTAL EUROPE
Convenors:
Renate Haas, University of Kiel, Germany, haas@anglistik.uni-kiel.de
Andrea P. Balogh, University of Szeged, Hungary, andreapbalogh@gmail.com

The full academic establishment of Women’s and Gender Studies is one of the most important achievements of the past forty years. As decisive impulses came from the United States, English Studies had special chances of translation (in the broad sense of the word). In the various countries, colleagues have met these challenges in a variety of ways, and, in spite of much international cooperation, the specific conditions and developments are still too little known beyond national borders. Therefore, the contributors to a forthcoming volume will present and discuss the central insights of their historical surveys. The seminar is, however, also open to newcomers.

SCULT6 CANCELLED

HAPPINESS AS A CULTURAL CONSTRUCTION: GENDER AND CONSUMERISM
Convenors:
Haluk Üçel, İstanbul Bilgi University, Turkey, h.ucell@gmail.com
Alexandra Bikkyová, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, sandrik.bikkyova@gmail.com

This seminar will focus on consumerism through construction of happiness and gender identities with past and contemporary references in modernity and postmodernity. Comparative cultural analysis will give a chance to explore the construction of happiness in meaning making. We will explore variety of print and audio-visual texts focusing on advertising and propaganda. We will question individuality in globalization and glocalization observing happiness as a commodity and as an ideological construction.

SCULT7 Sunday 31.8.2014 11.00–13.00

EXPLORATIONS OF ETHNICITY AND GENDER: (DIS)COVERING/ (DE)CONSTRUCTING IDENTITY IN AMERICAN FICTION
Convenors:
Cristina Cheveresan, West University of Timisoara, Romania, acheveresan@litere.uvt.ro
Brigitte Zaugg, Universite de Lorraine, France, brigitte.zaugg@orange.fr

From the “New Women”’s daring explorations of female identity at the turn of the 20th century to 21st century discourses on ethnicity and its (dis)contents, American writers have constantly set out to discover, understand and explain the mental, physical, emotional, and socio-political challenges of their condition. Irrespective of the paradigm they write in (be it Realism, Naturalism, Postmodernism or Postcolonialism), such innovators have broken taboos, exposed uncomfortable truths, fought stereotypes and opposed injustice. Papers are invited which analyze authors whose works have shaped evolving perspectives on ethnicity and gender in the United States by creatively emphasizing and transposing everyday issues.

SCULT8 Sunday 31.8.2014 16.00–17.30

ACCESSION 8 IMMIGRATION IN THE UK AND ITS IMPACT ON IDENTITY FORMATION AMONG THE NEW DIASPORAS
Convenors:
Andrew C. Rouse, University of Pécs, Hungary, andrew.rouse@pte.hu
Julius Rozenfeld, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, julius.rozenfeld@upjs.sk

Immigration has become a perceivable culture-forming element in British society. The objective of our seminar is to analyze contemporary results of immigration studies jointly with diaspora research in order to test validity of the different immigration theories and to clarify shifts in the modern understanding of diaspora concepts. Primarily, Accession 8 immigration and its impact on British society are under discussion with a special emphasis on interaction between the majority society and the immigrant communities, assuming that contemporary transnational connections enable the formation of multiple identities and allow for better integration without necessary assimilation. If modern migration cannot be correctly described by a single migration theory, the question whether the people decide to migrate out of curiosity or simply because they can is investigated from aspects of class, ethnicity and religion.

SCULT9 Tuesday 2.9.2014 11.00–13.00

THE PARTITION OF INDIA – BEYOND IMPROBABLE LINES
Convenors:
Elisabetta Marino, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy, marino@lettere.uniroma2.it
Daniela Rogobete, University of Craiova, Romania, dani.rogobete@yahoo.com

This seminar tries to explore one of the crucial events in India’s history, the Partition, and its impact upon the lives of the refugees caught in the process of reconfiguring physical boundaries and remapping geographical, cultural and political spaces. It will particularly focus upon various representations of Partition in literature and film as an event of massive displacement located between history and memory, between personal drama and collective trauma, between loss and rupture, between religion and nationalism, between longing and belonging. Topics may also include redefinitions of identity, domesticity and homeland triggered by the clash between memory, history and ideology.

SCULT10 CANCELLED

KISSING IN VICTORIAN BRITAIN: REASSESSING A CULTURAL PRACTICE
Convenors:
Béatrice Laurent, Université des Antilles et de la Guyane, beatrice.laurent@iufm-martinique.fr
Stefania Arcara, University of Catania, sarcara@yahoo.it

This interdisciplinary seminar intends to examine visual and textual representations of kissing in Victorian Britain from a cultural, socio-historical and gender studies perspective. Papers may propose analyses of kissing as a Victorian cultural and social practice in a variety of forms and contexts: the etiquette of “hand-kissing” as a mode of salutation, the chaste kiss of female friendship, the heterosexual lovers’ kiss as romantic climax or narrative turning point in art and literature, or as a subject of speculation for Charles Darwin, the “deviant” kiss of same-sex relations, the vampire’s or femme fatale’s deadly kiss, the stolen kiss penalized by Victorian courtrooms, the libertine or promiscuous kiss of pornographic fiction and many more variations. Examinations of Charles Darwin’s speculations on the origins of kissing would also be welcome. Through a discussion of the multifarious and diversified aspects of kissing in Victorian Britain we will seek to reassess the significance of a cultural practice, its literary and artistic manifestations and its place in the history of gender and sexuality.

SCULT11 Sunday 31.8.2014 (A)11.00–13.00, (B)16.00–17.30

GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN NEO-VICTORIANISM
Convenors:
Georges Letissier, University of Nantes, France, georges.letissier@univ-nantes.fr
Maria Isabel Romero Ruiz, University of Malaga, Spain, mirr@uma.es

The seminar will investigate the centrality of gender and sexuality in “neo-Victorianism”, including both scholarly works (history, cultural studies, social anthropology etc.) and creative works (fiction, film, arts) and the possible productive interaction between the two. The relevance of gender and sexuality identified as foundational at the inception of what is both a genre (with still undefined contours) and an academic discipline will be appraised by addressing questions of representation (performativity, scopophilia, voyeurism) and reception (“sexsational read”, bifocality etc.), without omitting the ethical and ideological implications of such aesthetic choices. The tensions between marginality and norms (queering, gender-bending) and the historical epistemology of sexuality may also be considered.

SCULT12 Monday 1.9.2014 11.00–13.00

PUBLICITY AND PROPAGANDA DISCOURSES IN THE MEDIA IN ENGLISH
Convenors:
María José Coperías-Aguilar, Universitat de València, Spain, maria.j.coperias@uv.es
Slávka Tomaščíková, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, slavka.tomascikova@upjs.sk

The media have traditionally been said to have the function of informing, educating and entertaining, but they have also been the arena used by a wide range of people and institutions to convince us about the qualities and benefits of buying their products or following their ideas. Both, publicity and propaganda, explicit or subliminal, are present in all media in different ways and formats. Contributions to this seminar could be focused on the analysis of any elements which constitute a token of publicity or propaganda in any kind of media, traditional or digital.

SCULT13 CANCELLED

SCANDALS & SCARES IN THE BRITISH MEDIA: DISCOURSE, REPRESENTATIONS, IMPACT
Convenors:
Susan Finding, Université de Poitiers, France, susan.finding@univ-poitiers.fr
Anémone Kober-Smith, Université Paris Nord – 13, France, anemone.kober@univ-paris13.fr
Michael Parsons, Université de Pau et du Pays de l'Adour, France, michael.parsons@univ-pau.fr
Edyta Rachfal, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice and PWSW Przemyśl, edytarachfal@gmail.com

What makes a media scandal? Why do scares regularly surface in the media? Why do they arise over issues of public health, private and national security, immigration, privacy, sleaze, public and private behaviour. How does the discourse reinforce or invalidate cultural studies theory? Does the reporting share narratives of decline and deviance? Secrecy and sources, information and transparency are themes that recur. This seminar will explore commonalities, instrumentalisation and impact on policy and politics and on the media. Comparative studies may explore how specific to the UK the way the British media deal with scandals & scares is.

SCULT14 Monday 1.9.2014 11.00–13.00

UNCANNY PRESENCES: THE PORTRAYAL OF EVIL IN CONTEMPORARY BRITISH AND AMERICAN TV SERIES
Convenors:
Stefani Brusberg-Kiermeier, Universität Hildesheim, Germany, brusberg@uni-hildesheim.de
Patrick Duggan, Exeter University, U.K., P.Duggan@exeter.ac.uk

This seminar investigates the construction of evil in contemporary British and
American TV series, which operate on a symbolic level and express the anxiety
of hidden evil alongside the wish for a tight control of deviation. They reflect
today’s visuality and performativity and entertain by creating mixed feelings
and sensations. The character constructions and aesthetics combine the realist
with the mythical or super-natural and are influenced by Gothic elements, which
is not surprising if one takes the domesticity of these media into account. Participants
might discuss re-negotiations of cultural concepts and dichotomies or analyse
the theatricality of contemporary small-screen cinematography.

SCULT15 CANCELLED

EUROPEAN MAGAZINES AND NEWSPAPERS (ESPRIT, THE EUROPEAN SOCIETY FOR PERIODICAL RESEARCH)
Convenors:
Wolfgang Görtschacher, University of Salzburg, Austria, Wolfgang.Goertschacher@sbg.ac.at
Marianne Van Remoortel, Ghent University, Belgium, Marianne.VanRemoortel@UGent.be

On behalf of ESPRit we invite papers on topics related to editing periodicals. Papers for this Europe-related panel (including the UK) might address shifts and continuities from periodicals to networks and from editing to curating. They might focus on such topics as the history of editorship; the relationship between editorship and authorship; editing in wartime; women editors; editing colonial publications; the work of particular periodical editors; writers and their editors; editors and national literatures; advertising influence on editors; letters to editors; editors' relationships to one another; the many types of editorial work; editing in different countries; editing in the 21st century, and fiction, film, and essays about editors of magazines or newspapers.

SCULT16 CANCELLED

LINGUISTIC AND LITERARY CARTOGRAPHIES: VISUALISING LINGUISTIC AND LITERARY NETWORKS
Convenors:
Marina Dossena, Univerrsity of Bergamo, Italy, marina.dossena@unibg.it
John Corbett, University of Macau, Macao SAR, jcorbett@umac.mo

This seminar invites participation from scholars involved in the visualisation of linguistic, literary and historical relationships. There has recently been an upsurge of interest in linguistic and literary cartographies, and in particular the use of digital media to map linguistic change, literary data and historical networks. The seminar offers an opportunity for researchers this area to showcase their work in progress, and to share good practice in the development of methodologies and software. We anticipate that the session will be of interest to those working in the areas of historical corpora, correspondence and social networks, lexicography and the digital humanities.

 

SCULT17 CANCELLED

BODIES AND/AT THEIR LIMITS
Convenors:
Clare Barker, University of Leeds, UK, c.f.barker@leeds.ac.uk
MarilenaParlati, University of Calabria, Italy, m.parlati@unical.it
NicolettaVallorani, University of Milan, Italy, nicoletta.vallorani@unimi.it

This seminar aims at interrogating the perception, figuration, manipulation of bodies in our contemporaneity, with particular reference to the liminal condition imposed by illnesses and disability. We are taking our cues from, one the one hand, A. Giddens and his suggestion that “bodies are projects”; on the other hand, we are obviously aware of the various, and notorious, difficulties in inquiring upon such an articulate topic. The language of the body tend to be deeply modified by physical conditions that are marked as pathological, because, as Peter Brooks maintains, if the sociocultural body is a construct, an ideological product, the physical body is precultural and prelinguistic. Sensations of pleasure and especially of pain are held to be experiences outside language. If, as Nancy suggests, bodies are limits, the focus of this panel will be that of opening up a space for discussion on the delicate and essential encroachments between illness, disability, agency and cultural production.

SCULT18 Tuesday 2.9.2014 11.00–13.00

SCULPTING THE OTHER: INTERSECTIONS BETWEEN LAW, LITERATURE AND CULTURE
Convenors:
Karen-Margrethe Simonsen, Aarhus University, Denmark, litkms@hum.au.dk 
Chiara Battisti, Università degli Studi di Verona, Italy, chiara.battisti@univr.it
Sidia Fiorato, Università degli Studi di Verona, Italy, sidia.fiorato@univr.it

The purpose of this seminar is to investigate the relationship between law and the Other in English literature and culture. Law has developed historically around figures of denial, prohibition and interdiction; juridical language aims at clearing reality of all its contradictions, reconducing it to univocal categories, defined roles and behaviour. However, the repressed Other threatens inexorably to return and it threatens to disrupt the order and reason of the legal system. The seminar will take into consideration the above-described issues from different theoretical perspectives fostering interdisciplinary approaches in the following fields: law and literature, visual arts, film studies, performing arts, ecocriticism.

SCULT19 Monday 1.9.2014 (A)14.30–16.30, (B) 17.00–18.30

F[R]ICTIONS OF TRUTH AND JUSTICE: REFRAMING “TERRORISM” IN LITERARY TEXTS AND FILMS
Convenors:
Carla Sassi, Università di Verona, Italy, carla.sassi@univr.it
Jessica Aliaga Lavrijsen, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain, jeskeal@unizar.es

As argued by many analysts in recent years, the way in which terrorism is defined and represented by the media “is an intrinsic part of how the thing itself – ‚terrorism‘ – came to exist as a social phenomenon in the late 20th century” (Jackson et al. 2011). The aim of our seminar is to investigate literary and filmic fictions of terrorism which, like James Robertson’s reframing of the Lockerbie case in The Professor of Truth (2013), function as a site of deconstruction and critique of the totalising discourse of terrorism by staging the quest for truth and justice as a painstaking and laborious process of negotiation between conflicting narratives.

SCULT20 Sunday 31.8.2014 11.00–13.00

“1914”
Convenors:
John Mullen, Université Paris-Est Crétéil, France, john.mullen@wanadoo.fr
Wolfgang Görtschacher, University of Salzburg, Austria, Wolfgang.Goertschacher@sbg.ac.at

Few dates have the terrible resonance as does “1914”. On its hundredth anniversary, we propose to focus on the events, images, memories and commemorations of this date. Choosing the one specific year allows us to look both at the experience and meaning of the last months of peace, at the arrival of war, and at the gradual realizations of the depth of the changes involved. We hope for a wide range of proposals; preference will be given to those which examine less well-covered areas of culture, history, and civilization.

SOCIAL PROGRAMME

SOCIAL PROGRAMME FOR CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS AND ACCOMPANYING PERSONS

Free guided tours of Košice for groups of 20–30 people are offered on Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday. These can be booked by conference participants and accompanying persons during the conference at the Registration and conference information centre.

A reading by James Robertson, a Scottish writer, will take place in the House of Arts on Friday at 17.00 and will be followed by the Concert and Welcome Dinner for conference participants and accompanying persons.

The Conference Barbecue for conference participants and accompanying persons is scheduled for Monday at 18.30 at the Rectorate.

OPTIONAL PRE-CONFERENCE AND CONFERENCE TRIPS FOR CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS AND ACCOMPANYING PERSONS

Conference participants and accompanying persons are offered several one-day trips and walks before and during the conference (from 25 August to 2 September). The contact person is Ms. Gabriela Sujanova (gabriela.sujanova@progress.eu.sk).

HOW TO BOOK OPTIONAL TRIPS

Bookings can be made online by filling in and submitting the Accommodation and Optional Trips Booking Form here. Once your booking has been received, you will be contacted by Ms. Gabriela Sujanov a with confirmation of your reservation and details of the amount to pay.
We recommend you to book your optional trips as soon as possible, before the end of June 2014 at the latest.

We reserve the right to cancel trips when fewer than 20 people are booked. If your preferred trip is cancelled you will be offered the choice of an alternative trip or a refund.

OPTIONAL TRIPS

TRIP NO.1

Levoča (UNESCO World Heritage Site) and Spišský Hrad (a medieval castle with a museum) – €30 per person. The fee covers transport by coach, a guide and entrance fees.
http://slovakia.travel/en/levoca-1
http://slovakia.travel/…-hrad-castle
 

TRIP NO.2

Stará Ľubovňa (a castle and an open air folk museum of Slovak village), Pieniny National Park, Červený Kláštor (a monastery), the Dunajec river trips on rafts – 40 EUR per person. The fee covers transport by coach, a guide, entrance fees, and trip on a raft.
http://slovakia.travel/…tara-lubovna
http://slovakia.travel/…k-of-pieniny
http://slovakia.travel/…veny-klastor
http://slovakia.travel/en/wood-rafting
 

TRIP NO.3

Bardejov (UNESCO World Heritage Site) and Bardejovské Kúpele (a spa and an open air folk museum of a Slovak village with a wooden church) – €20 per person. The fee covers transport by coach, a guide and entrance fees.
http://slovakia.travel/en/bardejov
http://slovakia.travel/…-of-bardejov
 

TRIP NO.4

Medieval wooden churches of Eastern Slovakia – €40 per person. The fee covers transport by coach, a guide and entrance fees.
http://slovakia.travel/…den-churches
(click on FILTERS and select Kosicky kraj and Presovsky kraj to view the wooden churches of Eastern Slovakia)
 

Trips to Vysoké Tatry (The High Tatras mountains):

http://slovakia.travel/…-high-tatras

TRIP NO.5
Tatranská Lomnica (a mountain village, a museum of skiing history) and cable car trip to Skalnaté Pleso (a tarn) /Lomnický štít (the second highest peak) – €60 per person. The fee covers transport by coach, a guide and cable car tickets.
http://slovakia.travel/…nska-lomnica
http://slovakia.travel/…-high-tatras
http://www.vt.sk/…alnate-tarn/
 

TRIP NO. 6
Trip through mountain villages – Tatranská Lomnica, Starý Smokovec, Štrbské Pleso (a lake) – short walk and a visit to Belianska jaskyňa (a cave) – €40 per person. The fee covers transport by coach, a guide and cave tickets.
http://www.vt.sk/…ska-lomnica/
http://slovakia.travel/…nska-lomnica
http://slovakia.travel/…trbske-pleso
http://www.vt.sk/…rbske-pleso/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?…
http://slovakia.travel/…jaskyna-cave

TRIP NO. 7
Starý Smokovec (a mountain village) and ground cable car trip to Hrebienok – one-way, back on foot (30 minutes down the slope on a paved surface – light walk) – €40 per person. The fee covers transport by coach, a guide and ground cable car tickets.
http://slovakia.travel/…ary-smokovec
http://slovakia.travel/…d-funiculars

Hiking trips to Slovenský Raj (the Slovak Paradise Park):

http://slovakia.travel/…lovensky-raj

TRIP NO.8
Tomašovský výhľad – for ordinary hikers – €20 per person. The fee covers transport by coach and a guide.
http://slovakia.travel/…lovensky-raj
 

TRIP NO. 9
Suchá Belá waterfalls – for experienced hikers – €20 per person. The fee covers transport by coach and a guide.
http://slovakia.travel/…lovensky-raj
Suchá Belá – A Guide to the Natural Wonders
http://stare.daphne.sk/…dacka_AN.pdf
 

Special offer:
TRIP NO. 10
Visit to the Slovak Tokay wine cellars – trip to Ostrožovič Winery on Saturday, Sunday or Tuesday – €50 per person. The fee covers transport by coach, tour of the cellars, 3-course dinner, and wine tasting.
http://slovakia.travel/…ion-of-tokaj
http://slovakia.travel/en/fotogaleria?…
 

Payment method

There are two ways of making payments.

1. payment by bank transfer to the conference bank account:
Any fees charged by remitting banks are to be paid by the conference participants. It is the responsibility of the sender to ensure that the conference receives the full amount. Any amount deducted by the banks for charges will be charged in cash on the first day of the conference.

Bank details for transfers:
Beneficiary name: Progress CA s.r.o.
Beneficiary address: Krivá 18, 04001 Košice, Slovakia
Bank name: Sberbank Slovensko, a. s. Košice
Bank address: Mlynská 29, 043 73 Košice, Slovakia
Account number: 4350225857/3100
IBAN: SK 14 31 00 0000 0043 5022 5857
SWIFT/BIC CODE : LUBA SK BX

Please ensure that your transfer is identifiable by including the message ‘ESSE 14’ and your name, e.g. ‘ESSE 14 John Smith’.

2. payment by credit card
To pay by credit card, please download THE CREDIT CARD AUTHORIZATION FORM here and complete it, ensuring that you sign it. Note that a 5% credit card fee must be added to the total. Send a copy of your form by fax (+421–55–680–6156) or as a scanned file attachment by e-mail (gabriela.sujanova@progress.eu.sk).

Receipts
Reception of payment will be confirmed by e-mail. Printed receipts will be issued at the registration desk.

INSURANCE

Please note that neither Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, nor SKASE, nor ESSE can accept liability for travel, accommodation, living or other expenses incurred by lecturers, convenors, co-convenors, or those invited to participate in round tables, seminars, PhD sessions or posters.
All conference participants should be aware that neither Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, nor SKASE, nor ESSE have or will accept any liability whatsoever for any damage or injury to visitors, to the university or to property, however such damage or injury may be caused. Delegates are expected to be fully insured by their own institutions or through their personal insurance for personal health, accident/property coverage (also against claims made by third parties) during their participation in the Conference.

Accepted participants

Attachments